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Backstrom to receive silver medal, IOC says Sweden doctor ‘made a serious error’

Mar 14, 2014, 1:23 PM EDT

Nicklas Backstrom will get an Olympic silver medal, even though he was suspended from Sweden’s gold-medal game defeat to Canada for testing positive for pseudoephedrine.

From the IOC:

The IOC Disciplinary Commission (DC), composed of Anita L. DeFrantz (Chairperson), Nawal El Moutawakel and Claudia Bokel, found that the provisional suspension was fully justified, not only due to the presence in excess of the applicable decision limit of PSE in his urine sample, but also due to the fact that the athlete conceded at the hearing, which took place shortly before the final match, that he had also taken medication containing PSE earlier that day.

The IOC DC took into account in particular that the athlete had been cooperative, had disclosed the medication in question in the doping control form and had relied on the specific advice of his team doctor that the intake of the medication would not give rise to an adverse analytical finding. There was also no indication of any intent of the athlete to improve his performance by taking a prohibited substance. Based upon these mitigating circumstances, the IOC DC considered that the athlete should be entitled to receive the silver medal and diploma awarded for men’s ice hockey.

Click here for a PDF of the full decision, which contains this relevant note:

source:

Related: Swedish coach ‘furious’ about Backstrom ban, claims IOC ‘made things up’

  1. 950003cups - Mar 14, 2014 at 1:30 PM

    What a pathetic group of imbeciles the IOC is. They knew it the whole time. Always some a-hole activist with an agenda in positions of power comes along and abuses that power, and ruins it for the rest of us just so they feel important. I think they should bring a lawsuit on that specific individual. It’s time people are held responsible for abusing power.

  2. 950003cups - Mar 14, 2014 at 1:33 PM

    Gotta love how they blame the Swedish doctor. How about blame the moron who issued the suspension based on a minuscule amount over the legal level of a legal chemical.

    • Jason Brough - Mar 14, 2014 at 1:36 PM

      Yeah, why blame the guy who recommended Backstrom take a medication that contained a substance that could result in a suspension? I mean, what possible role could he have played in all this?

      • bcsteele - Mar 14, 2014 at 1:43 PM

        Wow, get served!!!

      • 950003cups - Mar 14, 2014 at 1:55 PM

        Because it was fully legal to a slightly lesser amount.

      • 950003cups - Mar 14, 2014 at 1:59 PM

        If you go to a bar and have a beer, which is legal, then get pulled over and blow a .089 which is illegal, are you being irresponsible if that specific bottle contained a slightly higher alcohol content that you weren’t aware of? Do you blame your friends for getting you wasted?

      • btlpper68 - Mar 14, 2014 at 2:03 PM

        You mean Over the counter alegra?

      • elvispocomo - Mar 14, 2014 at 2:29 PM

        Terrible analogy. If you go to a bar expecting to drink any alcohol and then drive afterwards when many places have a zero tolerance rule in effect, is it your fault if the police stop you and find alcohol in your system? Of course it is.

        Now, if you were in a driving competition of some sort and they had very specific tolerances for a alcohol level, wouldn’t you check the alcohol content on any beer you might drink before entering said competition in case it was too much?

        “They said I was allowed some alcohol, so I’m going to to drink triple rye and cokes.”

    • joey4id - Mar 14, 2014 at 1:45 PM

      Did you read the article? found that the provisional suspension was fully justified, not only due to the presence in excess of the applicable decision limit of PSE in his urine sample, but also due to the fact that the athlete conceded at the hearing, which took place shortly before the final match, that he had also taken medication containing PSE earlier that day.

      joey4id – Feb 23, 2014 at 12:17 PM
      Again, this is totally on the doctors. It is their responsibility to ensure athletes are not taking banned substances. Hockey athletes are not the only ones being tested. Since Wednesday there were many medals given, and many tests to be performed before the men’s hockey gold medal game. It’s unfortunate for Backstrom, and when and how he was informed, but it’s more important for the IOC to maintain it’s standard, which they did. Now it’s time to focus on earning the paycheck (which he does very well) and help the Caps make the playoffs.

    • sabatimus - Mar 14, 2014 at 3:00 PM

      “If you go to a bar and have a beer, which is legal, then get pulled over and blow a .089 which is illegal, are you being irresponsible if that specific bottle contained a slightly higher alcohol content that you weren’t aware of?”

      Legally, yes.

      • ldpablo22 - Mar 15, 2014 at 3:50 PM

        Sabatimus …. LOL … I am pretty sure the person you quoted was saying that you ARE legally responsible if you take a bottle of alcohol that was higher alcohol than what you believed it to be. LOL. You can discern that from their next comment “Do you blame your friends for getting you wasted?” Which, they are surely saying “No”, you can’t blame them. In which case, you can’t blame a mislabeled or misrepresented bottle of alcohol. LOL

  3. hockeyflow33 - Mar 14, 2014 at 1:33 PM

    They make the NCAA look competent

    • anotheryx - Mar 14, 2014 at 4:02 PM

      IOC is simultaneously the most self righteous and the most corrupt organization out there, but they handled the whole incident the way they supposed to, can’t pin this one on them.

      • wvufan82 - Mar 14, 2014 at 4:21 PM

        They handled it correctly by proclaiming their divinity and then blaming the doctor?

      • hockeyflow33 - Mar 14, 2014 at 8:36 PM

        By prohibiting an innocent player from participating in a gold medal game?

      • anotheryx - Mar 17, 2014 at 11:48 AM

        He is NOT innocent. He has banned substance in his body, though through no fault of his own, still disqualifies him from participate. Or are you suggest that as long as players are not aware, team doctors are free to fill them up with whatever fancy meds available?

  4. bcsteele - Mar 14, 2014 at 1:35 PM

    Good for him; still feel for the fact he missed the game. Not sure it would have made much of a difference but you never know. Sweden could have used a puck mover against that WALL Canada had up.

  5. hockeyornothing - Mar 14, 2014 at 1:40 PM

    Glad he gets his medal!

  6. joey4id - Mar 14, 2014 at 1:47 PM

    The team doctor totally ruined a great day for Sweden’s national hockey pride.

    • stcrowe - Mar 14, 2014 at 1:56 PM

      I take it you ain’t no Waldeback girl?

      * For the uninitiated, this is a play on a music lyric.

    • btlpper68 - Mar 14, 2014 at 2:04 PM

      Agreed

  7. sjsharks66 - Mar 14, 2014 at 2:16 PM

    Hey 950003cups, Need some ice for that Brough Burn? :P

    • 950003cups - Mar 14, 2014 at 5:54 PM

      Are you 12 years old?

      • sabatimus - Mar 14, 2014 at 5:58 PM

        There’s something about a pot and a kettle in here somewhere, I know it.

      • 950003cups - Mar 14, 2014 at 7:20 PM

        Please share your ingenious insite with us? Break it down for us all.

  8. jpelle82 - Mar 14, 2014 at 2:21 PM

    what a disaster.

  9. sabatimus - Mar 14, 2014 at 3:01 PM

    Sweden has got to be absolutely enraged by this.

  10. hsnepsts - Mar 14, 2014 at 3:36 PM

    The thing is, this drug is in fact performance enhancing. Really easy to google the actual science. The IOC has to suspend people that use this. Its not an abuse of power.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16531903

    Its also really easy to test for, so no athlete would ever use this for actual cheating. Athletes cheat with growth hormone and brand new unknown drugs and other stuff that is much harder to test for.

    The swedish doctor is entirely at fault. Its his job to control the dosage. He’s not a regular doctor – he’s the Olympic team doctor. This is kinda what he’s there for. You go to him and say “I need to use this alergy medicine. I’d like your help in making sure my dosage is in accordance with IOC rules”. When you pee over the limit, he’s at fault.

    • wvufan82 - Mar 14, 2014 at 4:32 PM

      Worst scientific example EVAR. It cites ONE study with a whopping 7 people and the track wasn’t even in a climate controlled environment it was OUTDOORS! The weather could have been completely different between the 7 days which was not cited…

      It also says in the beginning of that article that it was removed from the banned list. So they essentially banned him for going over an arbitrary amount that has no scientific basis just conjecture?

      • 950003cups - Mar 14, 2014 at 6:00 PM

        I agree. I also feel that the IOC went overboard in its decision to suspend him. It’s not like he was positive for HGH or even Aderol.

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