Skip to content

Chiasson ‘shaken up’ by Peverley incident, won’t dress for Stars tonight

Mar 11, 2014, 12:47 PM EST

Dallas rookie forward Alex Chiasson won’t play tonight against St. Louis due to distress from the Rich Peverley incident — this according to Mike Heika of the Morning-News:

Chiasson, 23, appeared to be visibly shaken after Peverley collapsed at the bench in the first period of Monday’s game against Columbus. Heika noted that Chiasson visited Peverley in the hospital last night, and it’s unclear if he accompanied the team for its flight to St. Louis.

Today, Stars GM Jim Nill released a statement updating Peverley’s condition:

“Rich Peverley is resting comfortably and being monitored at UT Southwestern St. Paul.  He is currently undergoing testing to discover what triggered the cardiac event last night.

The focus of all the testing and monitoring is being dedicated to finding the cause of the event and a long-term solution to rectify the problem.

We do not have any more specifics at the moment.

Rich has been communicating with his teammates and friends.  He is extremely grateful for all of the prayers and support that he’s received from fans and friends alike.”

Dallas has called up forwards Colton Sceviour and Chris Mueller from AHL Texas on an emergency basis, and it looks like both will play tonight.

  1. lowenni - Mar 11, 2014 at 12:48 PM

    This is a very classy move by the team, and Chaisson is still a young guy. Good for him and them to give him the night off so he can rest up, and maybe visit Peverley again as well. Scary stuff, and I don’t blame Chaisson at all for being scared and shaken.

    • patthehockeyfan - Mar 11, 2014 at 8:18 PM

      The NHL Network reported this evenin that Chiasson was treated at hospital yesterday for anxiety. I mention this now so that people understand that Chiasson wasn’t just a little upset about seeing Peverley drop. The experience had a physical effect on Chiasson to the point that he had to be treated at hospital.

      • patthehockeyfan - Mar 11, 2014 at 8:19 PM

        *evening

  2. darksidecowboy - Mar 11, 2014 at 1:02 PM

    All Class Dallas, GO STARS!

  3. hammerhead5573 - Mar 11, 2014 at 1:02 PM

    Agreed Iowenni, couldn’t have said it better. At the end of the day, it’s a sport, which is secondary to lots of stuff.

  4. jpelle82 - Mar 11, 2014 at 1:04 PM

    ok…i’m fully prepared to take the full brunt of the thumbs down on this but i have to say my piece here. as a man who saw my best friend get his head blown off just feet away from me when i was just 20 years old…..i feel like this is pretty damn ridiculous. believe it or not thats not even the most traumatic thing i’ve witnessed or dealt with in my life (though now that the image is in my head again its pretty high up there). this kind of pussification in the world we live in now is just sickening. come on. the guy got sick, got medical attention, and is fine now. get over it. what are you going to do if someone you know actually dies – retire?

    • ibieiniid - Mar 11, 2014 at 1:08 PM

      I’m sure this NHL player is sorry he can’t be more like you.

      • kaptaanamerica - Mar 11, 2014 at 7:29 PM

        Jpelle is correct regarding the change in society. This change in societal values is nothing new. It is all a product of the “groupthink” that is taught in schools where everyone is sheltered from the reality of life and the harshness of the world. The welfare state and similar hallmarks of western society ensure that the average westerner never experiences what the majority of people on this planet experience. those people being the ones living in the 3rd world and those who think like 3rd worlders, but live in a more technologically advanced society (see most countries in the middle east, except Israel).

        when children don’t get failing grades, or don’t have “winners” and “losers” in school sports, it teaches children the kinds of values that result in Chiasson needing a timeout from reality. I’m not espousing one way of thinking or the other, just pointing out that this is what society has come to be at this point in time. Perhaps that’ll change if there is some kind of watershed moment that jars westerners out of their cocoon.

        just see what is depicted in “The Walking Dead” as an allegory for what people really need to do to survive when the comforts of 1st world living are taken away and there isn’t any time for molly coddling everyone.

      • patthehockeyfan - Mar 11, 2014 at 8:13 PM

        Thank you, kaptaanamerica, for your view of the world through the prism of “The Walking Dead.”

        I can’t believe I’m going to write this; but, do me a favor, would you? Blow it out your butt.

      • kaptaanamerica - Mar 11, 2014 at 8:54 PM

        It’s not my “view of the world”. it’s been documented as observation of society, just google it and you’ll find all sorts of studies, newspaper articles etc.. discussing this change in society. it’s been going on every since the industrial revolution and before. society has gotten to the point where it wants to remove the harshness of the natural world from human existence.

        you may not agree, but that’s what is occurring. I’m not taking a position in my earlier comment, so not sure why you are getting all weird about it.

      • patthehockeyfan - Mar 12, 2014 at 7:16 AM

        First, kaptaanamerica, allow me to apologize for my initial response to your comment. It was a reaction to a comment with which I/we are becoming all to familiar – that is, what’s wrong with our society. I snapped. That’s no excuse, and I’m sorry.

        This story’s comments went in two directions. In one, jpelle remarked that Chiasson should not have reacted the way he did, and should have continued playing. That’s his opinion, and a lot of people took exception to it. My reaction to his comment was to ask why he believed that he should judge Chiasson’s reaction. I don’t think any of us should judge others. To take it further, everyone reacts differently to different situations. We can hypothesize as to how we might react (and give ourselves better marks – which is understandable); however, each situation is different and subjective. I objected to jpelle’s judging another based on his reactions to a situation that occurred to him. In short, there is no comparison, and we don’t actually KNOW how we’d react.

        The second issue I had with your comment was how our society is viewed in terms of comparing it to, as you put it, 3rd worlders. Of course, we’ve adapted as a society. Our wonderful organ – the human brain – has made advances to make our lives more comfortable. Rather than suffer heat and humidity, we’ve developed air conditioning. If we were to simply accept nature, we wouldn’t have developed the car (or airplane) to get from point A to point B. Nature intended us to walk. Neanderthals would have suffered rain, cold and other elements rather than taking up refuge in a cave, and they wouldn’t have discovered how to make a fire to keep warm.

        You call this molly-coddling. I call it evolution. My point here is that the brain adapts. And, should calamity befall us, our brains would adapt to that, too. Perhaps I have an optimistic opinion of humans (maybe Pollyanna-ish), and maybe it’s unrealistic; but I believe in the better nature of humans. I don’t mind that, should I be wrong, I’ll be disappointed. I’d rather live expecting the better of people than the worse.

        Finally, I confess I haven’t seen “The Walking Dead.” Should zombies start walking among us, though, I’ll be sure to see it on Netflix so I’m prepared for what pitfalls to avoid. Thanks for the tip. (that was a joke)

        Sorry for the long-winded reply. Some day, when the story is about ice hockey, we’ll get back to commenting on ice hockey. And, again, sorry for my initial comment to your post.

      • kaptaanamerica - Mar 12, 2014 at 7:54 PM

        Thanks for the comment back Pat. more often than not people make aggressive remarks without a second thought. I’m glad, though we may disagree on our terminology, that the conversation moved in a civil direction.

    • theageofquarrel - Mar 11, 2014 at 1:11 PM

      You are tough and Chaisson is not. Ok,got it.

    • patthehockeyfan - Mar 11, 2014 at 1:14 PM

      I believe you quoted scripture in one of your comments yesterday, jpelle. Luke, if I’m not mistaken.

      I’m agnostic; yet, I need to quote Matthew to you: “Judge not, that ye not be judged”

      • ibieiniid - Mar 11, 2014 at 1:17 PM

        no no no pat. that’s pussification. compare everybody else to yourself. if they aren’t alike, trash their character. that’s today’s scripture.

      • jpelle82 - Mar 11, 2014 at 1:47 PM

        if you’re agnostic i wouldnt expect that you’ve actually read Matthew judging by the lack of contextual application here. in Matthew 7:1 Jesus says not to judge or you will be judged according to your measure. Matthew 7:2-5 continues by letting the disciples know not to judge hypocritically – it applies to judging others for sins that you yourself have committed…which i didnt do here.

      • ibieiniid - Mar 11, 2014 at 1:58 PM

        regardless of what the bible says, you’re a huge sh** bag.

      • nj666 - Mar 11, 2014 at 2:09 PM

        of course jpelle is an avid bible reader… I wouldn’t have guessed it any other way.

      • jpelle82 - Mar 11, 2014 at 2:25 PM

        ibieiniid – Mar 11, 2014 at 1:17 PM
        no no no pat. that’s pussification. compare everybody else to yourself. if they aren’t alike, trash their character. that’s today’s scripture.

        ibieiniid – Mar 11, 2014 at 1:58 PM
        regardless of what the bible says, you’re a huge sh** bag.

        you made it a whopping 41 minutes before eating your own words. congratulations hypocrite.

      • ibieiniid - Mar 11, 2014 at 2:30 PM

        oh yeah? where did I compare you to me? i’m not trashing your character because you’re different than me, I’m trashing it because you clearly don’t care about anybody’s feelings but your own.

        there’s nothing wrong with being a little sensitive to death (or near-death). there’s something wrong with the inability to empathize.

      • jpelle82 - Mar 11, 2014 at 2:43 PM

        you clearly dont like my opinion so therefore you called me a huge sh** bag. you dont know me from adam yet you call me a huge sh** bag because i share an opinion of the situation thats different than yours. seems pretty hypocritical to me. i judged chiasson, you judged me for judging him. how is that any better? you obviously dont care about my feelings just like i dont care about his. how are you different?

      • ibieiniid - Mar 11, 2014 at 2:59 PM

        ok ok, if you think I’m a hypocrite, believe that. but in my book, judging judgemental douchebags > judging somebody because of their reaction to their friend almost dying next to them.

      • hockey412 - Mar 11, 2014 at 3:48 PM

        These comments have me laughing louder than is appropriate for my office…I hope Peverley is all good and makes a healthy return (IF it’s healthy) and I hope the kid is ok…the idea of mortality itself is tough for young people.

        But that having been said, I “regardless of what the bible says, you’re a huge sh** bag.” is one of the funniest things I’ve read on here.

        Well played, everyone, and thank you :)

    • rabidbillsfan - Mar 11, 2014 at 1:19 PM

      I’m sorry but I couldn’t disagree more. Honestly, that has to be one of the most disgusting comments I have read in quite sometime, if not ever. Pussification? Are you kidding me? While I admire your courage to get past what you witnessed, I find it completely ridiculous that you question this man. Everybody deals with these issues differently. I’d expect you to have compassion for this kid, not the other way around. While I’m not sure how your friend met his demise, falling at the hands of a weapon does not compare to watching somebody be overcome by mother nature. It brings about a sense of mortality, the possibility that at any moment, it could be your last breath. What makes it even worse, these guys are machines, their bodies are in tip-top shape, not some obese chain smoker who puts himself at risk. I did not think I would ever be as disgusted with somebody’s internet jibberish, but you have taken the cake. I would say it is people like you who question the morals of others that is the problem with this world today.

      • jpelle82 - Mar 11, 2014 at 1:29 PM

        i didnt question anyone’s morals first off. its not a moral issue, its a character one. i questioned how a grown man could be shaken up over another man going to the hospital…to the point where he lets down 20 other men by having to skip a game over it. secondly, i held my own child in my arms as she died, so i’ve experienced mother nature as well and i wouldnt classify one being more difficult than the other – death is death. peverley didnt flippin’ die.

      • lowenni - Mar 11, 2014 at 3:35 PM

        ” I did not think I would ever be as disgusted with somebody’s internet jibberish”

        Haha, have you ever been on the Internet before?

        But competely agree with everything you said @rabidbillsfan. Well put.

    • joey4id - Mar 11, 2014 at 1:23 PM

      jpelle82, I get the fact that you’ve been hardened by your past experiences. And I’m sure the soldiers on the front line who don’t return with PTSD are tough dudes. Many of the players are young kids without that tough experience, and you can’t expect everyone to react and be effected the same way. Both teams saw a player just crumble to the floor with no apparent reason, unlike a player he gets his knee popped on the office, they had no information about the status of their friend, teammate, and opponent. For all they knew he may have been dead or dying. I think you need to take a step back from your experiences and put yourself in the context of those player and coaches who were close to the incident. You’ve got to accept the fact that not every human being will react the same way when faced with a traumatic event.

      • laxnhockey - Mar 11, 2014 at 2:58 PM

        “they had no information about the status of their friend, teammate, and opponent.”

        Speaking of idiots, we have more garbage from joey4id.

        Making comments and statements, like the above, that she knows nothing about. You just have to love today’s keyboard cowboys.

      • joey4id - Mar 11, 2014 at 3:03 PM

        Really! Do you sleep well at night? I doubt they had any information on his health before he went to the hospital.

      • joey4id - Mar 11, 2014 at 3:49 PM

        Hey! Chris! You and Kyle been friends for a long time? Just found out you guys are buddies.

      • chicagobtech - Mar 11, 2014 at 3:09 PM

        joey4id’s comment about the internal nature of Peverley is probably what hit the players the most. Unlike incidents were players were sliced open by skate blades, or get their heads slammed to the ice, or (to borrow from jpelle82’s experiences) seeing a friend get shot, Peverley up and dropped to the bench area floor. Seeing an injury happen in front of your eyes allows your brain to see what happened, which will usually help get the coping mechanism started. Not being able to see the cause of the incident really doesn’t help. And while people knew about Peverley’s heart, they also saw him playing at the top level of hockey. In the back of their mind they may have thought he was just like the rest of the players in the NHL. But then he drops for no reason they can see? An event like that very well can shake a person to the core.

    • mattryannolan - Mar 11, 2014 at 1:27 PM

      I love how you’re trying to justify this by one upping the events. I’m sorry you have had to deal with that but this isn’t a contest to see who can see the most traumatic thing. So if we want to talk about “pussification” let’s talk about the “grown man” who has to talk about how manly he is and all the stuff he’s seen as some sort of 6 year old cry for attention and look for me bull crap. If the guy can’t perform his job to his fullest potential due to the incident then he shouldn’t have to be out there.

    • thomasvanek - Mar 11, 2014 at 1:36 PM

      This isn’t a competition idiot. People like you make me sick.

    • budzo83 - Mar 11, 2014 at 1:53 PM

      @jpelle82: For the most part, professional athletes live in a protective bubble. For those of us that live in the “real world,” this might not be as jarring of an event. That said, I think the kid deserves a pass on this one. For all we know, this might be the most traumatic thing he’s ever experienced first hand. Futhermore, I think Dallas fans should be encouraged by Chaisson’s character level; Most 23 year-olds (especially 23 year-old NHLers, I would think) are still too ego-centric to experience that level of concern for someone who isn’t a parent/sibling/lifelong friend. Good on, ‘ya.

    • budzo83 - Mar 11, 2014 at 1:53 PM

      @jpelle82: For the most part, professional athletes live in a protective bubble. For those of us that live in the “real world,” this might not be as jarring of an event. That said, I think the kid deserves a pass on this one. For all we know, this might be the most traumatic thing he’s ever experienced first hand. Futhermore, I think Dallas fans should be encouraged by Chaisson’s character level; Most 23 year-olds (especially 23 year-old NHLers, I would think) are still too ego-centric to experience that level of concern for someone who isn’t a parent/sibling/lifelong friend. Good on ‘ya.

    • nj666 - Mar 11, 2014 at 2:05 PM

      people who are worrying about the “pusification” of this world are the ones attributing to the retardation and idocracy of this world.

    • pastabelly - Mar 11, 2014 at 2:10 PM

      I’d love to see you “drop the gloves” and go at it with Chaisson for five minutes. We’d see how tough you were when not behind your keyboard.

    • pats2001 - Mar 11, 2014 at 2:23 PM

      looks like i was late to the bashing party here…jpelle82, peverley clearly has a heart condition that puts his life at risk, not just his career. he didnt get sick and then get medical attention…he has a real cardiac problem that he needs to figure out.

      he also has a family and close friends that care about him. as a boston sports fan, the first thing most of us thought of was reggie lewis, which was one of the worst moments in the history of boston sports (i know most people don’t care about boston these days, but this was an actual real-lfe moment). excuse us if we’re trying to share our sympathy with him and the people close to him.

    • bsaures - Mar 11, 2014 at 2:30 PM

      jpelle82- Wow way to honor the memory of your best friend by being a dbag about someone who just had their good friend almost die real classy. I assuming you think all the other soldiers who go through similar PTSD symptoms after seeing their friends die are pussies as well.

      Its people like you that give military groups a bad name. You strut around like your better than everyone else and talk down to them just because they still have a conscious.

      • jpelle82 - Mar 11, 2014 at 2:45 PM

        you assume i served in the military?

    • murphy1117 - Mar 11, 2014 at 3:17 PM

      Peverly’s heart stopped on the bench and the have him one jolt with the defibrillator in the tunnel before taking him to the hospital. If someone’s heart stopping is what you call “getting sick” then your definition and mine differ significantly.

    • afrozenpond - Mar 11, 2014 at 5:17 PM

      @ jpelle82

      Keep believing in those sky wizards, pal.

    • kaptaanamerica - Mar 11, 2014 at 7:27 PM

      This change in societal values is nothing new. It is all a product of the “groupthink” that is taught in schools where everyone is sheltered from the reality of life and the harshness of the world. The welfare state and similar hallmarks of western society ensure that the average westerner never experiences what the majority of people on this planet experience. those people being the ones living in the 3rd world and those who think like 3rd worlders, but live in a more technologically advanced society (see most countries in the middle east, except Israel).

      when children don’t get failing grades, or don’t have “winners” and “losers” in school sports, it teaches children the kinds of values that result in Chiasson needing a timeout from reality. I’m not espousing one way of thinking or the other, just pointing out that this is what society has come to be at this point in time. Perhaps that’ll change if there is some kind of watershed moment that jars westerners out of their cocoon.

      just see what is depicted in “The Walking Dead” as an allegory for what people really need to do to survive when the comforts of 1st world living are taken away and there isn’t any time for molly coddling everyone.

      • patthehockeyfan - Mar 11, 2014 at 8:15 PM

        You wrote the same crap above. Spare us your lectures.

  5. xaile94 - Mar 11, 2014 at 2:13 PM

    will people please stop telling jpelle82 that they admire or appreciate what he may or may not have gone through in life? first or all, it’s completely irrelevant. secondly, he clearly learned nothing from it. trademark of a moron.

  6. jpelle82 - Mar 11, 2014 at 2:17 PM

    if you guys want me to get on my soap box i can dive in further for you. and i will admit that if it comes off like a one up or a contest, i certainly didnt mean it to be so. there are a lot “tougher” people out there than me and have seen worse. however, i stand by what i said. it cheapens the experiences of others when people get or recieve special treatment for circumstances that are diminutive in comparison. there are people that get purple hearts for stubbing their toe and ptsd diagnoses because their dog gets hit by a car. it spits in the face of a man who got a purple heart for having his leg blown off or actually has ptsd from seeing it happen. its our society that perpetuates this kind of pussification and when a person in a position of influence like a hockey player who young men look up to takes a day off because his friend went to the hospital, it sends the wrong message to those young boys who look up to him. i didnt jump all over stajan when his kid died. i can empathize with that and its a real reason to miss a game or two. the problem i have is that chiasson getting a game off now makes it seem like he’s got just as much of an excuse or grief as a stajan does or patrick kane did when his grandfather died. its not even in the same ballpark as those two situations yet he gets the same treatment? how can you condone it? i bet peverley is sitting there like wtf dude, im the one who is in the hospital…go play and help your teammates. if i were a dallas fan and my 8 yr old son asked why chiasson isnt playing, how do i explain that the guy gets a day off because his teammate is in the hospital? he would look at me like i was lying to him…

    • xaile94 - Mar 11, 2014 at 2:25 PM

      we’ve seen you on your soapbox. nobody wants to experience that again.

    • ibieiniid - Mar 11, 2014 at 2:25 PM

      “it spits in the face of a man who got a purple heart for having his leg blown off or actually has ptsd from seeing it happen.”

      how do you not see by now that you’re the only one that thinks that? not all of us value life as little as you do, or have to compare one situation to another situation everytime. I’d tell you to shut your mouth already, but I’m really enjoying giving you as many thumbs downs as possible. keep it up.

    • patthehockeyfan - Mar 11, 2014 at 2:36 PM

      Okay, jpelle.

      Understanding everything you just wrote here, I have questions: who are you to judge and measure what’s worse for some and not for others? When did that become your domain? Who appointed you god (or God)?

      Read what others have written here. Not necessarily those who’ve attacked you. Read what joey4id wrote (1:23 p.m.). I rarely agree with joey; but, I thumbed up his remark. Budzo83 (1:53 p.m., and posted twice for emphasis) also wrote a comment worth considering. I mention these two because they are compassionate remarks.

      After what you wrote on the Stajan story, I guess it was wrong for me to assume that you had compassion, and maybe empathy for someone. Instead, it’s as if you’re thinking, “Buck up, guy! He didn’t freakin’ die! Go play hockey!”

      And, it’s just wrong to assume what Peverly might or might not be thinking.

      Chiasson couldn’t handle it. Don’t condemn him for it. Be understanding. And, for heaven’s sake, TRY to be compassionate.

      P.S. You were right. I was totally out of my element quoting Matthew.

      • xaile94 - Mar 11, 2014 at 2:42 PM

        you can’t win this one with reason. it’s just another sign of the grand pussification of America.

      • jpelle82 - Mar 11, 2014 at 3:17 PM

        i get it, its not the most popular position to take but i’m not incapable of compassion either as you witnessed the other day. if the kid has never seen something like this happen to someone i can see how he can be shaken up by it, just like the rest of the people in the arena were last night. but thats about where it ended for me. i generalized at the kid’s expense but i’m not going to apologize for it and i’m not going to post flowers and rainbows about it either. i think its doing the kid an injustice to bend over backwards for him, especially because it does nothing to help him prepare for when the inevitible s*** will actually hit the fan.

      • xaile94 - Mar 11, 2014 at 3:58 PM

        it’s not about popularity of opinion. the issue is that you’re walking a line towards sociopathy and wearing it as a badge of courage.

    • grocerystick101 - Mar 11, 2014 at 3:06 PM

      What you call “pussification”, most people call empathy. Your lack of it probably hurts people in ways you don’t even realize. You might want to keep that in mind while raising your son.

      • therealjr - Mar 11, 2014 at 3:32 PM

        “First thing Rich asked me when I spoke to him- ‘how much time left in the period’. You know, typical athlete”-Coach Ruff

        So the guy who collapsed is on his near death-bed asking to get back in and Chiasson needs to take a game off and collect his feelings? Hope he’s spending his time in therapy, that’s beyond empathy, that’s a mental problem.

      • jpelle82 - Mar 11, 2014 at 3:48 PM

        thank you

  7. laxnhockey - Mar 11, 2014 at 3:35 PM

    jpelle82 has made a valid point and backed it up with his correct assessment about the pussification of America; everyone gets a trophy so we don’t hurt someone’s feelings.

    Despite joey4id’s insider information that “they had no information about the status of their friend, teammate, and opponent”, it was reported in another article that coach Lindy Ruff said last night he was going to be ok.

    I’m going to go out on a limb here and align with Lindy Ruff who may know a little more about the situation than joey4id is reporting from her mom’s basement.

    The rest of you need to get back in the kitchen and help grandma with the cookies; leave the heavy lifting to other more capable souls.

    • patthehockeyfan - Mar 11, 2014 at 3:43 PM

      You have this strange obsession with joey4id.

      • laxnhockey - Mar 11, 2014 at 3:58 PM

        Not so much with joey4id, just idiots in general who spout off things that they know nothing about. joey4id just has the inability to stop punching the keys.

    • joey4id - Mar 11, 2014 at 4:05 PM

      A$$hole-Chris, Lindy Ruff reported the information during a conference after Peverley was admitted to the hospital, and after the game was cancelled. So, the players didn’t know it while the were on the ice immediately after the incident.

      You don’t need insider info for that. Ask your bud Kyle.

      Show us you have the ability to stop punching your keyboard. Disappear!

    • jpelle82 - Mar 11, 2014 at 4:58 PM

      the fact that nobody skipped a game back in 98 when pronger died on the ice just proves the evolution of our society. pussies are everywhere now and proud of it.

      • afrozenpond - Mar 11, 2014 at 5:21 PM

        You call it pussification, intelligent people call it progress. We are trying to preserve life on this planet. When we know things are harmful, we attempt to adjust. What does your sky wizard think of our “pussified” society? Has the painting on you wall begun to weep and send you messages? Please share…

    • joey4id - Mar 11, 2014 at 6:01 PM

      Chris, where did I ever write that I had insider information?

  8. deeleeh - Mar 11, 2014 at 3:37 PM

    jpelle82 – Whether you sympathize with Chaisson or not the team is doing what they feel is best for everyone. Right now the team is fighting to make the playoffs so I’m sure they want to know the people they put on the ice have their heads totally in the game. It’s easy to understand why Chaisson is so upset about Rich Peverly, but the team still needs to win this game against a difficult opponent, so this is the best decision for everyone.

  9. miketoasty - Mar 11, 2014 at 3:48 PM

    This is why I love hockey so much more than any other sport out there. I mean Football players are questioned when they miss games because of their child’s birth yet the Stars are down to earth enough to let a player miss a game due to being shaken up from a scary incident involving a friend.

    Much respect Dallas.

  10. flyerspsu - Mar 11, 2014 at 4:37 PM

    Jpelle you are an idiot, Peverly didnt just “get sick and go to the hospital”, his heart stopped and would have died if he wasnt rushed quickly to the doctors allowing them to defibrillate, give him chest compressions and oxygen to get him back to life

    • jpelle82 - Mar 11, 2014 at 4:54 PM

      thanks buddy for clarifying that.

    • joey4id - Mar 11, 2014 at 5:04 PM

      I’m no defending jpelle. He can do that himself. You! flyerspsu need to get your facts straight. Though it was indeed a scary moment for everyone, and Peverley was in distress, his heart did not stop.

      • laxnhockey - Mar 12, 2014 at 8:56 AM

        You don’t know if his heart stopped or not, but it seems the oxygen has stopped flowing to your brain.

      • joey4id - Mar 12, 2014 at 12:12 PM

        Yes! Chris! It has which is why I’m on conscious as I type. Has the LA fog clouded your judgement? :-)

    • joey4id - Mar 11, 2014 at 5:06 PM

      Well! No one reported it stopped. It was reported that he suffered heart arrhythmia.

  11. killerpgh - Mar 11, 2014 at 5:46 PM

    Could you imagine the comments here if Crosby took the next game(s) off after Brooks Orpik got attacked from behind, lost consciousness and left the ice on a stretcher in the Bruins games earlier this season.

  12. cmmorgan32 - Mar 11, 2014 at 8:21 PM

    Simply put, people have their own ways for coping with difficult circumstances. Considering the fact that Dallas is on day 2 of a back to back, I completely agree with the team’s decision to scratch Chiasson tonight. It doesn’t benefit anyone if he’s in the lineup and isn’t there mentally (especially given his role on the team). I’m sure there would’ve been guys on Detroit’s roster in 2005 who wouldn’t have been in the day 2 lineup if they had a game the day after Fischer collapsed.

  13. henrik4dawin - Mar 11, 2014 at 10:32 PM

    He’s 23, give the kid a break, he is still basically a glorified teenager. He is not a veteran of years of hockey and has probably not seen somehting like this before. Let him rest and think over the situation before he gets back into action

    • laxnhockey - Mar 12, 2014 at 9:03 AM

      Back in the day a 23 year old was a man, and probably had a wife and kids to feed while scratching a living on a small farm. They just don’t make ‘em like they used to.

Featured video

More than a Stanley Cup hangover?
Top 10 NHL Player Searches
  1. S. Crosby (3925)
  2. B. Bishop (3094)
  3. D. Krejci (2496)
  4. C. Crawford (2337)
  5. C. Kunitz (2170)
  1. O. Palat (1928)
  2. C. Perry (1904)
  3. B. Elliott (1850)
  4. T. Oshie (1790)
  5. T. Hall (1535)