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PHT’s top 13 of ’13: Kovalchuk retires, returns to KHL

Dec 25, 2013, 12:00 PM EDT

Ilya Kovalchuk Reuters

Ilya Kovalchuk was supposed to be a Devil for the rest of his career. He was one of the team’s best forwards and poised to stay in New Jersey for the duration of his 15-year deal.

But in 2013, the plan changed. After a lockout-shortened campaign that saw him deal with injury and finish second on the team in points, he called it “probably my worst season,” then stunned the hockey world by retiring from the NHL in June.

Kovalchuk’s retirement didn’t mean he was walking away from the game itself. Rather, he was bailing on the Devils to go play back home in the KHL.

He forfeited the remainder of his $100 million contract to play for the team he suited up for during the lockout – SKA St. Petersburg. Kovalchuk’s mother said his time with SKA during the lockout inspired him to find a way to return, which he did in dramatic fashion.

Of course, he had to make sure the Devils would allow him to go. And asking the team to be OK with parting ways had to be some kind of awkward, especially after all they went through to get him. When the Devils were negotiating with Kovalchuk during the summer of 2010, they were busted for circumventing the salary cap on their first agreed-upon deal. Their punishment? Forfeiting a future first-round pick, a punishment that will come into effect at the 2014 NHL Draft.

So, what was the Devils’ motivation to part ways with Kovalchuk?

For one, they were in a financial bind as the salary cap was reduced to $64.3 million following the lockout-shortened season. They were also dealing with cash-flow issues, as then-owner Jeff Vanderbeek was seeking to sell the team. Having Kovalchuk’s monster contract on the books made both those situations more difficult.

source: Getty ImagesLamoriello agreed to let Kovalchuk go and with it controversy erupted over the Devils finding a way (again) to escape the clutches of the upper limit of the salary cap. Months later, Vanderbeek sold the team to a group led by Joshua Harris.

With Kovalchuk off the books and on his way to Russia, the Devils suddenly had money to spend — and did so by signing Jaromir Jagr and Damien Brunner to free-agent deals.

Jagr alone has helped make people forget about Kovalchuk leaving town with his handling of the press and, oh yeah, his ability to keep scoring at age 41.

As for Kovalchuk, life is good for him in Russia. SKA named him team captain and he’s essentially the face of the KHL. He’s currently eighth in the league in points, averaging over a point per game.

  1. phillyhockeytalk - Dec 25, 2013 at 12:11 PM

    Merry Christmas PHT!

  2. polishblue - Dec 25, 2013 at 12:45 PM

    i still think kovy will return to the nhl one day. i think his move wasnt just “family reasons” but a way to gaurantee his spot on the Sochi team too.

    ps wesolych swiat!

    • capsfan14 - Dec 26, 2013 at 5:56 PM

      The guy would have had a spot on the team even if he retired. A guy with that kind of talent and numbers to backup his elite status doesn’t need to move to Russia to solidify his olympic spot. (Not even sure how that would help)

  3. nj666 - Dec 25, 2013 at 2:15 PM

    who?

  4. devilsarethebest - Dec 25, 2013 at 3:29 PM

    don’t even…

  5. shawnthehockeykid - Dec 25, 2013 at 3:55 PM

    This was a really stupid move by him, but you really could understand why. The way he did it though was just horrible and I feel bad for NJD fans. BTW check out crashthenet.ca if you are a normal person and have convos there as well.

  6. pfhockey - Dec 25, 2013 at 4:31 PM

    Kovy’s a douche, no way defending this guy, a sellout. Good player but a douche.

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