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Devils are ‘unanimously’ against hybrid icing, surprised it passed

Oct 1, 2013, 9:48 PM EST

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The 2013-14 season will introduce hybrid icing into the mix, which is a nice nod toward improving safety, but it might cause some confusion. For instance: the New Jersey Devils are confused it was voted in.

People from head coach Peter DeBoer to Martin Brodeur expressed their disapproval to the Bergen Record on Tuesday.

“I think it’s a rule that is going to cause us some headaches, for goalies anyway,” Brodeur said.

Defenseman Bryce Salvador believes New Jersey voted “unanimously no” on hybrid icing, and said that just about everyone he spoke with were on that wave length.

DeBoer isn’t quite as mad as the rule change’s biggest critics. Instead, he thinks that the NHL should either go with touch icing or no-touch icing rather than something that’s more of a compromise for both sides.

“If you really want to be safe, you might as well call it like college hockey, international hockey,” Brodeur said. “If they’re really worried about it, why risk it?”

Like it or not, the Devils and the NHL’s other 29 teams must adjust to this change.

  1. jimw81 - Oct 1, 2013 at 10:20 PM

    finally something to keep marty btw the pipes.

    • hockey7515 - Oct 1, 2013 at 11:21 PM

      What about the trapezoid?

  2. zlax45 - Oct 2, 2013 at 12:09 AM

    Marty should get the rules right before talking. College Hockey had hybrid icing last season and will continue with it.

  3. macjacmccoy - Oct 2, 2013 at 12:23 AM

    Sorry for the book but read anyway,

    Everyone needs to relax this is a rather innocuous rule change. Its not like taking away checking or or fighting. Their is still a race to the puck. It just takes out the risk of a player getting injured because hes more worried about touching the puck then he is about protecting himself from a head first collision into the boards. Getting hurt is a part of hockey and Im ok with that, but Id rather it happen on a hockey play and not a race. Especially when the race could be made safer by just making the finish line a few yards closer.

    The only concern I have, which is really more of a question then a concern, is what is considered to be a win. Does the Stick count? Like for example if a defenseman’s stick reaches the dot first even though he is behind the offensive player does that still count as a win and an icing? Or does it have to be a body part? If it has to be a body part does sticking your arm out count, or is it more a central mass thing?

    Im sure the officials have be briefed on what is considered a win and what isnt, but my problem with this whole thing is that the NHL hasn’t done a good job of making the answers to these concerns readily available enough.

    It seems rushed, and that’s probably because it was. They should have either waited to implement the rule change till next season, so everyone could be up to speed on the nuances of the rule, or they should have done a better job of getting the information out.

    The way this has all unfolded is going to lead to a lot of confusion and hand wringing to start the year. There’s going to be a lot of sound bites and quotes of coaches, players, and fans wondering why their team had an icing go against them when their player’s stick or hand got to the dot first.

    If the NHL and its owners just used a little forethought before haphazardly implementing a rule change, all the soon to be confusion and discontent could have been avoided.

  4. millertime1101 - Oct 2, 2013 at 4:09 AM

    this rule can cost devils

  5. 950003cups - Oct 2, 2013 at 4:25 AM

    College has no touch icing. Either way, I like no touch icing.

    • zlax45 - Oct 2, 2013 at 2:58 PM

      College has hybrid icing.

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