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Bergeron on injuries: ‘It’s about pain management at this point’

Sep 10, 2013, 9:02 AM EDT

Patrice Bergeron Getty Images

Patrice Bergeron played through several significant injuries during the Stanley Cup Final and he hasn’t completely recovered from them.

“I still feel it in the rib area,” Bergeron told CSN New England. “It’s more about rotations and when I do core stuff, but I don’t think there are any limitations in any way. It’s about pain management at this point.”

The 28-year-old forward is confident that this won’t prevent him from taking part in training camp or being available for the Boston Bruins season opener and given what he’s already played through, it’s hard to question him. That being said, he hasn’t endured full contact yet.

In addition to the “tenderness” in his ribs stemming from his broken rib and torn cartilage, Bergeron is coming off of a separated shoulder and punctured lung.

Bergeron has established himself as one of the game’s best two-way centers over the last few years. He’s entering the final campaign of his current contract, but he’s already agreed to an eight-year, $52 million extension that will keep him with the Bruins through 2021-22.

  1. hockey412 - Sep 10, 2013 at 9:08 AM

    Hell of a player, hell of a man. Nine more years is a long time to get the snot kicked out of you that badly though…just an observation.

    • dropthepuckeh - Sep 10, 2013 at 9:49 AM

      That’s because he plays hockey. If a guy is skilled enough to last in the league for many years he is going to suffer injuries. Most NHL players play 5-6 years. Bergeron has already been in the league ten years (2003 first year). This guy is the ultimate warrior.

      • hockey412 - Sep 10, 2013 at 10:01 AM

        I guess that’s my point – he most certainly is NOT the ultimate warrior – ultimate competitor maybe. The ultimate warrior would not be banged up and still hurting from last season going into training camp. Boston may want to look at what he was playing through if they want him to last 9 more years, is all. Lots of talent on that team.

      • dropthepuckeh - Sep 10, 2013 at 10:16 AM

        He is the ultimate warrior. He played through the pain regardless of serious injuries. Bergeron’s season only ended June 25. It’s not like he has had six months to recover. He has had a little over two months. Maybe your fictitious warrior miraculously grows a new rib when he is struck by Zolton’s lightning bolt but in the real world humans take a little more time.

        Do you really think the Bruins management weren’t on top of the implications of him playing? This is big business for them and they wouldn’t sacrifice their player, especially not Bergeron. They would also be opening themselves up to a huge liability.

      • lopo - Sep 10, 2013 at 10:27 AM

        “This guy is the ultimate warrior.”

        No doubt Bergeron is really tough, but there have been others that have played through excruciating pain.

        Steve Yzerman and the Red Wings 2002 cup run comes to mind…

        “Needing to prop himself up with his stick every time he fell to the ice, Yzerman grimaced and winced his way through the playoffs. The Red Wings ended up capturing their third Stanley Cup in six seasons.

        After the Cup run, Yzerman had a knee realignment surgery normally reserved for the elderly, causing him to miss the first 66 games of the 2002-03 season, an indication of how bad his knee was during the ’02 playoffs.”

        http://bleacherreport.com/articles/371585-the-10-most-inspirational-nhl-stories-of-all-time/page/3

      • hockey412 - Sep 10, 2013 at 10:36 AM

        Not trying to ruin any fairy tales for ya, honestly. He’ll be open season at the drop of the puck for any goon looking to hurt him, and based on the length of his hospital stay at the end of last year I really don’t think Bruins management saw past the cup. I certainly don’t think they were looking 9 years down the line…that was my only point.

        You’re right – he’s human, not a warrior…certainly not “the ultimate warrior”.

    • lombardisshineinfoxborough - Sep 10, 2013 at 3:31 PM

      Hey Pens fan, still bitter I take it? Anybody who doesn’t consider Bergeron a warrior (or whatever other word you want to use that describes somebody that’s tough as nails with a huge heart) simply doesn’t know what they’re talking about.

      • hockey412 - Sep 10, 2013 at 3:35 PM

        What part of “Hell of a player, hell of a man” sounds bitter to you? There are many, many tough as nails competitors in the NHL and Bergeron is definitely one of them. That’s not the freaking point, though. Read closer, without the Bruins party goggles on.

  2. amityvillefun - Sep 10, 2013 at 10:16 AM

    You either leave it all on the ice or wish you did. Bergeron can easily say he did his best and gave his all in the Finals.

    When you see guys like Bergeron putting their bodies on the line and other guys like Seguin phoning it in and afraid to go in corners, well, you can understand why they traded him.

    Campbell, Bergeron….true hardcore Bruins!

    • hockey412 - Sep 10, 2013 at 10:38 AM

      Also both from Canada.

  3. amityvillefun - Sep 10, 2013 at 10:47 AM

    So is Seguin.

    But yes, they are all from Canada, eh?

    “Take Off to the Great White North! Take Off, it’s a beauty way to go!”
    - Geddy Lee, another great Canadian

  4. erbaker67 - Sep 10, 2013 at 10:52 AM

    I think it would be much wiser for him to wait until he is 100%. I am sure the competitor in him does not want to wait until then but its the beginning of the season. Let the younger guys trying to make the roster fill his spot to see what they can do and if comes back at say game 8, thats an extra 2 weeks off. I dont see the point in rushing a guy who has a history of injuries to not be 100%. I dont think anyone at this point would call the guy soft for doing whats best for his health.

  5. pepper2011 - Sep 10, 2013 at 1:23 PM

    Hey hockey412 – you seem a little bitter about your teams cap management, as well as;Geno, Sid and Kris being made of glass. There is no fairy tail. Plain and simple dude puts it all out there.

    “he’ll be open season for any goon”

    Really?

    See that’s the thing about the B’s – teams don’t really take too many liberties with them, what are they going to do check him? jump him? This isn’t some scrub; we are talking about one of the most respected guys in the league. I am betting if anyone goes after him they would need to get through Chara, Lucic, McQuaid, Thornton, Campbell, Iginla, Boychuck, and even Seidenberg – a literal ton of Bruin.

    Was Sid’s head open season for any goon? Are Giroux’s wrist open season? what about Geno’s knee.

    It’s an ignorant statement. Pick a team; pick their goon, and then figure out if the star of that team would want to have that target on their back because a guy who is barely in the league decided to be a bone head.

    He was in the hospital for the lung – which was more than likely punctured between periods from the local they used to numb his ribs. Ribs heal, just slowly and painfully in the process. I bet at least 25% of Hockey players have broken ribs at some point in their career.

  6. terrier92 - Sep 11, 2013 at 4:58 AM

    The night of the iginla fiasco the Bruins played Canadians and lost a very frustrating game. What I witnessed also that night was Bergeron play one of the best three zone games I have ever seen. The guy is a smart tough competitor. Take that back it was the best complete game I have ever seen. They should show the video to kids to explain how to correctly play the game. His game has always been subtle nice to see it get noticed. A lock again for Team Canada. Geez last Olympics he was hurt with a bad groin and they kept him and used him exclusivley for defensive faceoffs. Hockey folks now how good and valuable he is.

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