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Walkom to replace retiring Gregson as NHL Director of Officiating

Aug 7, 2013, 12:53 PM EDT

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Former referee Terry Gregson has retired from his role as the NHL’s Senior Vice President and Director of Officiating, the league announced today.

Gregson was named to the position in 2009 following an officiating career that included 1,427 regular-season and 158 playoff games. The 59-year-old will still be involved as a league consultant.

“Terry had the unique ability to expertly manage the 78-man NHL officiating team,” said Colin Campbell, NHL Senior Executive Vice President and Director of Hockey Operations. “His tireless efforts behind the scenes to ensure that NHL officiating was the best it could be on a nightly basis were seldom recognized publicly, but we greatly appreciate his dedication to the game both on and off the ice for the past 33 years. We are also pleased that he has agreed to continue to work with the Officiating Department on various projects.”

Replacing Gregson will be Stephen Walkom, who held the position from 2005 to 2009 before returning to the ice.

Walkom will be “leaving the ice effective immediately” to take over Gregson’s role, according to the league.

“We are fortunate to have someone with Stephen’s on- and off-ice experience ready to step in to this position,” said Campbell. “From 2005 to 2009, Stephen provided tremendous direction and guidance to our team of officials as the League implemented several rule changes that brought more flow and speed to our game. That management experience, combined with the fact that he has been back on the ice as a referee for the last four years, will be of tremendous benefit to the League and the game.”

  1. Brian - Aug 7, 2013 at 1:04 PM

    Good news. Last time Walkom took that job refereeing improved noticeably, mostly because he wasn’t calling games anymore.

  2. greenmtnboy31 - Aug 7, 2013 at 1:07 PM

    A good news, bad news story. It’s good news, actually great news that Walkom will be “leaving the ice effective immediately” given his disastrous performance in the post season this year. Kudos to those who recognized his deficiencies and got him off the ice where hopefully, he will do less harm. That’s the good news.

    The bad news is that he now has an opportunity to negatively influence a whole new crop of upcoming on-ice officials. Perhaps he can use his own mistakes as an example of areas where they can easily improve and not impact the outcome of games as he did this post season. Perhaps he can explain why making a call 80 feet behind the play, a call that gets passed on for every other game of the season, on a a little pushy/shovy between two players is a idiot’s call. Perhaps he can explain that the linesman should step in, as they do in that situation in every other game of the season, and break the two players up since they aren’t amounting to anything.

    • comeonnowguys - Aug 8, 2013 at 8:51 AM

      Wasn’t he also the one that watched as Torres hit Hossa? Originally suspended 25 games… not even a minor?

  3. endusersolutions2013 - Aug 7, 2013 at 4:19 PM

    Interesting, when I saw this my 1st response was gladness that he would not be directly officiating himself.

    • ivbc11 - Aug 12, 2013 at 1:07 PM

      amen endusersolutions2013n @ amen–he is the worst ref they have

  4. canucks30 - Aug 8, 2013 at 4:37 AM

    The officiating in the NHL is a joke.

    -Signed hockey fans everywhere

  5. shoobiedoobin - Aug 8, 2013 at 12:26 PM

    Walkom, Gregson, c’mon. They’re both garbage and you know exactly why the NHL promotes guys like them. Do the dirty work and get a reward. Typical mom’n’pop move that makes the NHL seem so rinky dink.

    The NHL has a serious officiating problem. Favoring the flavor of the month team used to be occasional, now it’s so endemic I’m surprised when the Chicagos and Pittburghs don’t get every game called their way.

    Funny, after two lockouts my interest in hockey is dying for OTHER reasons. Only outta Bettman and his croneys I tell ya.

    • comeonnowguys - Aug 8, 2013 at 1:22 PM

      You realize that Walkom’s most recent notoriety happened after he made a terrible, potentially series-outcome-affecting call against one of the “flavor of the month” teams you mentioned, right?

      • shoobiedoobin - Aug 8, 2013 at 4:36 PM

        Except that it was the right call.

        I figured someone would derp out and look only at one example and ignore everything else. That’s the internet for you. Nevermind he favored them all series, no, that one at the end is all you notice. DEERRRP.

      • comeonnowguys - Aug 8, 2013 at 5:14 PM

        1) Absolute wrong call. The guy was getting driven to the ice.
        2) Did he officiate all seven games? That’s a serious question.
        3) Yes, that’s the only thing I noticed. I’m purely cherry-picking one thing. Along with the media and fans for the next few days following the game.
        4) When in doubt, or lacking an actual counterpoint, DEERRRP!

      • shoobiedoobin - Aug 8, 2013 at 6:52 PM

        1. You might want to start being clear about what call you’re talking about. I don’t feel like this flopping into a microargument about that when you try to claim something different.
        2. No, who would officiate all 7 games of a series? I already know where you think you’re going with this but try anyway.
        3. You were for a fact cherry picking. Fans, media, blah blah, irreverent. You were cherry picking, nice try.
        4. Or just dealing with a devil’s advocate playing, cherry picking internet generation goofball. Sometimes there’s no deeper meaning than you simply just derpin it up.

  6. jpat2424 - Aug 8, 2013 at 6:28 PM

    He’s terrible.

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