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Expert believes that time is running out for players, owners

Oct 6, 2012, 5:44 PM EST

Fehr-Bettman-Getty Getty Images

Sports management professor Rodney Fort told Yahoo’s Nick Cotsonika that he finds it hard to believe that the NHL and NHLPA are really that far apart in the CBA talks.

“I still have this fundamental, analytical belief that we could hear them just reach an agreement any day,” Fort said with a laugh. “I really have a hard time believing they’re actually that very far apart. … I won’t be at all surprised [if they reach an agreement] after the weekend, or next weekend.”

Like many others, Fort believes that this lockout is drastically different from the last one.

Interestingly, Fort also said that the players’ (perceived?) concessions might place the decision in the owners’ hands.

“The owners actually have a prize,” Fort said. “It might not be exactly the prize they want, but there is a prize. The players have offered them something, and they’re paying a price while they wait.

“The basics of it are pretty straightforward: The NHL has to weigh what they demand versus what they’re offered.”

While this analogy would have been more mouth-watering during the summer, it’s still fun to picture Gary Bettman, Bill Daly and the Fehrs splitting up a melting Popsicle, as described in the story:

Because the Popsicle is already out of the freezer, it is melting steadily, drip by drip, day by day. The faster the Big Four reach an agreement, the more they will have to divide. The longer they take, the less will be left. Eventually, there comes a point where the Popsicle won’t be a Popsicle anymore — just a pool of goo, a sticky mess.

By that logic, a lost season would be a puddle of sugary sadness.

  1. stakex - Oct 6, 2012 at 6:54 PM

    This could have a little something to do with why the players have been unwilling to make a new offer. They know a deal might be close, and they are afraid of giving up more then they would have to… so they are instead hoping the owners make a new offers so they can see where things stand.

    Thats why often times to final part of negotiations are the hardest. No one wants to give up any more then they absolutely have to…. but you never know exactlly what the other sides magic number is. Thus everyone is afraid to make an offer at that point.

  2. atfinch1984 - Oct 6, 2012 at 8:41 PM

    Professors should stick to professing. Hockey players can stick to jockeying. (b)Owners will stick to (b)owning! Go hockeyists!

  3. atfinch1984 - Oct 6, 2012 at 8:42 PM

    LOL *hockeying

    • manchestermiracle - Oct 7, 2012 at 12:28 PM

      Oh, I thought maybe you had a different horse in this race….

  4. sharkcity408 - Oct 6, 2012 at 8:58 PM

    Gary Bettman gets to sit on the stick

  5. hockeyflow33 - Oct 6, 2012 at 9:12 PM

    Anyone from a big sports town has the same qualifications as this guy

  6. blomfeld - Oct 6, 2012 at 9:29 PM

    TALK ABOUT STATING THE OBVIOUS …

    This nincompoop of a professor should go back to professing whatever the hell it is he professes ! Edward the Confessor could have told us more ! He says that … “I still have this fundamental, analytical belief that we could hear them just reach an agreement any day”. You do eh Einstein ? Well thank God you’re gratuitously sharing that bit of “fundamental & analytical” brilliance with us ! What a joke … 90% of the bloggers here post more intelligent comments than this clown !

  7. dbarnes79 - Oct 6, 2012 at 9:49 PM

    Just get a deal done, and soon!!

  8. rbern11162 - Oct 7, 2012 at 7:44 AM

    The owners don’t care if there is a season . They know that the last time a season was cancelled , they destroyed the union .and got everything they wanted . The players don’t care . They are playing in Europe , and getting payed . What does that mean . No season

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