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Video: Why Martin Brodeur must hate the trapezoid

May 23, 2012, 11:10 PM EDT

Whenever a seemingly arbitrary delay of game penalty is called, the Twitter rage boils over regarding “the NHL’s worst penalty.” I can understand that sentiment, but for my money, the goalie-inhibiting trapezoid is the poorest post-lockout tweak.

The rule was essentially made to curb the forecheck-killing skills of Martin Brodeur (and a few others), yet that hasn’t really come true. That doesn’t mean Brodeur is a fan of the innovation, however, and that point was likely cemented after Marian Gaborik gained at least a little bit of redemption with this odd goal:

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Luckily for Brodeur and the New Jersey Devils, this clip is essentially a footnote as Ryan Carter scored the game-winner and they took Game 5 by a score of 5-3 and a 3-2 series lead. And if nothing else, maybe it gives Mike Smith a little comfort.

  1. quonce - May 23, 2012 at 11:20 PM

    The only reason those trapezoid lines are there is because of him and him only. Once he is retired those lines will go away on the first rules committee vote.

    • quizguy66 - May 24, 2012 at 11:36 AM

      Yup. Bobby Clarke put that rule in specifically to target Marty. Ridiculous that the NHL ever adopted a rule to legislate against a player’s skill. I’ve noticed in recent years the trapezoid has been “revisited” but you know it’ll go probably the day after Marty retires.

      Another example of a rule designed against a player was when the league did coincidental minors that kept things 5-on-5 which was a direct response to how well the Gretzky Oilers played in 4-on-4 situations.

      -QG

  2. quonce - May 23, 2012 at 11:22 PM

    Who are the few others? It’s only Brodeur. Mark my words, within a season his retirement, those lines are gone

  3. quonce - May 24, 2012 at 11:57 AM

    Quizguy66 gets it!

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