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Did the media tip off the Predators about Radulov and Kostitsyn partying?

May 6, 2012, 12:59 PM EST

Alexander Radulov Getty Images

It’s the scandal that won’t totally go away for Nashville and while we’ll likely see Alexander Radulov and Andrei Kostitsyn play for the Predators in Game 5 tomorrow night, the stories swirling around about how they were busted for staying out partying are getting interesting.

New York Post hockey guru Larry Brooks reports Radulov and Kostitsyn were busted not thanks to Barry Trotz checking when hotel cards were swiped but a more traditional method: They were tipped off.  Brooks explains who did the snitching.

We’re told by a trusted, uh, party that it was a couple of members of the media who ran off to Nashville management to tattle on Radulov and Kostitsyn. This is odd enough behavior in itself.

Brooks says the tattletale effort is part of a more jingoistic culture in hockey meant to put down Russians while North American players get a pass. Mike Richards and Jeff Carter might disagree with this thanks to their exile to “Dry Island.”

The more curious question here is: Should the media be doing the team’s job for them? Given how poorly Radulov played in Game 2 the team would’ve likely found out something was up, but there’s something a little uncomfortable about this if it did play out this way.

As a fan, are you OK with your team’s players being ratted out like this or should teams do their own investigating?

  1. sabatimus - May 6, 2012 at 1:15 PM

    While most people hate a snitch, they still broke team rules and the suspensions were warranted.

  2. rainyday56 - May 6, 2012 at 1:41 PM

    …”you write the stories, I’ll provide the war. ”
    -William Randolph Hearst

  3. hailll - May 6, 2012 at 1:48 PM

    Why is it OK to break a story about infidelity, drug use or an arrest but not out all night drinking? Is it because the reporters want to be their friends? You build them up to tear them down. All the while the fans spend their money expecting the players to show up sober and ready to play. Living in DC you hear the stories about the Redskins and Caps partying all night but everyone in the press is afraid to do their job because they want to be invited to the golf tournaments and parties thrown by the players and their agents. Soon my money will be spent elsewhere.

  4. bcisleman - May 6, 2012 at 3:31 PM

    The Islanders of the early 1980s didn’t win 4 straight Cups and almost a 5th because there were no other talented teams in the NHL. A number of them had comparable talent. They won because of character and discipline…the kind of character and discipline that led Ken Morrow to play in the 1983 SCF several days after surgery on his knee when he could barely walk at times. It led Nick Lidstrom to play in a SCF several days after–cough–another sort of surgery.

    Watch this Legends of Hockey profile of Phil Esposito–especially from 4:21 to 5:00. Espo opines that the Orr-Espo Bruins of the early 1970s could have won 4-5 Cups in a row. That’s debatable, but there’s no doubt that a lack of discipline and character hurt the team.

  5. Brian - May 6, 2012 at 5:56 PM

    What were the reporters that did the tipping off doing out that late? Presumably they’re on paid travel for work, maybe the players should rat them out to their employers in turn.

  6. mydadyourmom - May 6, 2012 at 6:31 PM

    snitches get stitches

    • zach28 - May 6, 2012 at 6:54 PM

      kostitsyn is in deep with the russian mob!! media watch out

  7. dreamzilla - May 7, 2012 at 3:39 AM

    @ mydadyourmom……. boy u hit it right on the head with what im thinking …u beat me to the punch…so ill just co-sign what u just said because i live and die by the code….SNICHES GET STICHES!!!!!! respect the code!

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