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Video: Corey Perry’s controversial non-tripping call, game-winning goal

Feb 9, 2012, 11:06 AM EDT

Heat is still radiating from the contentious finish to Anaheim’s 3-2 overtime win over Carolina on Wednesday night. With just under three minutes to go in the extra session, Ducks forward Corey Perry appeared to trip ‘Canes forward Jussi Jokinen behind the Carolina net.

Then, things got interesting:

Here’s some of the Twitter feedback, first from CBC’s Elliotte Friedman:

source:

Next, from Los Angeles Times reporter Helene Elliott:

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Finally, Luke DeCock from the Charlotte News & Observer:

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Key figures from the Ducks and ‘Canes had slightly different takes on the game-winning goal.

“They didn’t blow the whistle, so you keep playing,” Perry said. “I found Brookbank, and he made a great play back to me. We’ve had bad calls against us all year, and maybe this was a turning point for us. We’ll see.”

“It’s just unfortunate there in overtime to have a call like that go against us and end up costing us another point,” Carolina captain Eric Staal said. “Our compete level was there, we were on pucks, we were aggressive, we were attacking.”

  1. dlsmith621 - Feb 9, 2012 at 11:59 AM

    Terrible, disgraceful, but typical of the type of officiating we see every night in 2012 (see 3rd period of the Winter Classic for another sterling example). When is the league going to do something about this? These refs should be suspended.

    • miketoasty - Feb 9, 2012 at 12:22 PM

      Suspension? No, but the league does need to pull all the ref’s aside and lay down that they need to be fair in handing out penalty’s and not just go for the even upper because the crowd wasn’t happy with a call earlier in the game.

  2. seanthegreatest - Feb 9, 2012 at 12:48 PM

    I was at the game last night, and I can tell you everyone in the building was shocked at the no call. I will say though that the refs blew a huge interferance call just before the end of regulation that should have gone the Ducks way. Not saying it makes it ok, but things tend to work themselves out in the end. Just sayin.

  3. yettyskills - Feb 9, 2012 at 2:41 PM

    LMAO WOW, most obvious and easiest call to make and he doesnt.

    Shameful

  4. welkersstache83 - Feb 9, 2012 at 3:25 PM

    Both these teams are irrelevant so who cares

  5. banggbiskit - Feb 9, 2012 at 3:31 PM

    As a Ducks fan, im used to getting the short end from the Refs….i was shocked that this penalty wasnt called, they almost always call that…i think the ref probably got a sick feeling in his stomach when that puck went into the net. If this happened to the Ducks, i would have been seeing red..feel bad for the Canes, that should have been called, ref blew it.

  6. hsnepts - Feb 9, 2012 at 4:18 PM

    Here’s what gets me. If the ref doesn’t want to call that play, which I can understand, why doesn’t he just blow the whistle and have a faceoff? No penalty, but no advantage on the play. Seems fair to me… But the ref can’t. He’s actually not allowed to.

    The refs actions are extremely restricted by the letter of the rules, that they are left with only a marginal ability to manage the game. So crap like this happens.

    I know head-office tries to control what happens in-game this way, in an attempt to reduce the perception that refs are biased. But that perception exists anyways, and isnt going away. So they should give the power back to the refs.

    Strip the rulebook back to the basis, and give the refs the reigns. The refs know who the jackasses are, and they know who meant to do what. They know what a hockey play is. They know when a guy needs to sit for a couple, and when a puck fired over the glass is actually a delay of game.

    maybe thats going to far – but the ref in this case should be allowed to blow the play dead.

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