Skip to content

Marchand and Bruins continue to negotiate as training camp approaches

Sep 13, 2011, 10:59 PM EDT

Brad Marchand AP

Contract negotiations are a funny thing. Sometimes it can seem like there’s no hope—then the two sides come to an agreement quickly. Other times it seems like things are going relatively well, yet they drag on longer than anyone expects (see: Weber, Shea). Teams, players, and agents will all tell you the same thing: as long as both sides are talking, there’s hope. When contract talks break off—that’s when there’s cause for fear.

The good news for Bruins fans is that restricted free agent Brad Marchand and the Bruins are “working every day” to reach common ground. More specifically, the Bruins and Marchand’s agent are working every day to work a deal out. Marchand explained that the talks have increased recently:

“We’re working every day and hopefully something will be done before camp.”

(snip)

“I am a part of this team and there’s no reason for me not to be. I want to be here and I want to show them I’m in shape and I’m ready to go this year. I’m just waiting to see and get it done here.

From the team’s perspective, that’s exactly what they want to hear. In fact, Marchand is ready to get going—but unsurprisingly, it doesn’t sound like he’ll be able to practice with the team until a contract is finalized. Peter Chiarelli spoke to Joe Haggerty at CSNNE.com about the tone of the negotiations:

“It’s neither contentious nor amicable. It’s just a normal negotiation and it’s not done yet. He’s obviously a good player and a good kid, and we want to get him signed.”

Such is life with restricted free agents these days. The Bruins aren’t the only team dealing with a situation like this; and this isn’t the first year we’ve seen restricted free agents go down to the wire. Each team wants to get a deal done—because barring a freak offer sheet, each of these players is going to play for their respective teams during the 2011-12 season. They aren’t going anywhere. The sooner they can get signed and into camp, the better for any team trying to compete this season. No one wants to see a situation where the player ends up holding-out.

Like the saying goes, “if it weren’t for the last minute, nothing would ever get done.”

Both sides are looking at a shorter-term deal in the Marchand discussions. If both sides agree on a two-year deal like Haggerty says, then it will just come down to money. Is he worth Logan Couture’s $2.9 million per season? Is he worth the approximate $2.4 million per season that Teddy Purcell signed for in the offseason?

Odds are that his contract will end up in the Purcell neighborhood while he tries to prove that his incredible playoff performance was more than an aberration. If he can prove that he’s a perennial 20-goal scorer, who plays with grit, and has the ability to raise the bar in the playoffs, he’ll make his money in the future.

Of course, first thing is first. He needs to sign his “second” contract before anyone starts worrying about his “third” contract.

  1. pastabelly - Sep 13, 2011 at 11:39 PM

    $2.6M a year for thee years and get it done.

    At least, they’re closing in on a LT deal with Krejci.

  2. pastabelly - Sep 14, 2011 at 4:13 PM

    He did better with a two-year deal at an average of $2.5 per year because he gets $3M in year two and that will set him up well for his next deal. Little Ball of Hate got a good deal out of a pretty tight team.

Featured video

Bettman hears the boos in Philly
Top 10 NHL Player Searches
  1. S. Crosby (1866)
  2. L. Stempniak (1577)
  3. D. Roy (1507)
  4. R. Nash (1315)
  5. A. Rome (1240)
  1. M. Ribeiro (1214)
  2. C. Franson (1162)
  3. R. O'Reilly (1133)
  4. D. Cleary (1115)
  5. P. Subban (1070)