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The untradeable player looking for redemption: Gilbert Brule

Sep 9, 2011, 1:18 AM EDT

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Say what you want about Gilbert Brule—he’s had an remarkable offseason. This is the guy who made headlines during the Stanley Cup final for picking up a hitchhiker in Vancouver’s Stanley Park; a passenger that happened to be Bono from U2. A few weeks later, he was reportedly traded at the draft as part of the prodigal son, Ryan Smyth’s return to Edmonton. The deal with LA fell through because of questions surrounding his concussion recovery; thus leaving him in the awkward position of being an Oiler—but knowing the Oilers tried to trade him.

The point that gets lost in all of this, is that Brule was supposed to be a star when he was drafted 6th overall in 2005. Back in the WHL with the Vancouver Giants, he showed that he was the type of player who could play on the edge, agitate the opposition, stick up for teammates, while racking up significant points. Those were the days.

Like so many other Columbus Blue Jackets draft picks, Brule struggled once he hit the NHL. He only managed 12 total goals in over the course of three seasons in Columbus, before he was shipped to Edmonton for Raffi Torres. In a league that isn’t always kind to youngsters, he was afforded the gift that many prospects would kill for: a second chance.

In 2009-10, he finally looked like he had turned the corner and found his niche in the NHL. While playing an improved all-around game, Brule set career highs in goals (17), assists (20), and points (37) over 65 games. His timing couldn’t have been better as he parlayed the career season (and show of potential) into a two-year contract worth almost $2 million per season. If he could build on his newfound success, he’d be set up for a long, profitable career. Then the injuries hit again.

He had a problem with his spleen. He had the flu. He had problems with a bad ankle. Then to cap it all off, he had a concussion that ruined the rest of his season. For a guy looking to build on his previous success, each and every ailment proved to slow the momentum he had worked so hard to create.

Entering yet another contract year, Brule will have to earn the opportunity to prove his worth. As Jim Matheson from the Edmonton Journal reports, there’s a place for Brule if he fights for it:

“…It’s very crowded at forward, but if Brule can stay healthy and can get his emotions in check, he’s exactly what the Oilers need. He can skate, he can hit, he can win face-offs on a team that was 44 per cent last year, worst in the league, and he’s got a wicked shot. He brings a lot to the table when he’s right.”

The emotions that Matheson speaks of could be the key to next year and beyond for the 25-year-old. Brule spoke to Matheson about the mental side of the game that he’s been fighting with over the last few years:

“I’ve been working with a sports psychologist like crazy this summer to get away from thinking I should have done this, I should have done that. That drags me down. I’m thinking too much after games. You do that and you can’t get to sleep.”

“Last year I was just going along. I didn’t know what to do. I’ve talked to our sports psychologist Kimberly Amirault and with Dr. Saul Miller in Vancouver.”

If Brule can get his head straight, he should prove to be a much more valuable player than simply the buy-out candidate that the Kings were looking for in June. He’s shown signs over the course of his career—just mix in a little consistency and he can be a professional for years to come. Now we’ll just see if he can work the “contract year” magic that so many players seem to find.

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