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Best and worst sweaters of all-time: Dallas Stars

Aug 12, 2011, 8:00 PM EDT

Brenden Morrow AP

All right, listen… Not all sweaters can be big winners and remembered forever. The Stars have a nice look to what they’ve got and throughout their history in Dallas they’ve done well embracing the black and green. Unfortunately, they’ve got a much better looking past to contend with among NHL fans outside of Dallas.

Instead of picking one side or the other here to suck up to, I’ll make sure to tick everyone off in some way. Here’s to hoping that Brenden Morrow, Steve Ott, or Neal Broten don’t show up at my door and punch me in the gut.

Best: I’m going to do my best to not pick a Minnesota North Stars sweater here because those days are over. With that stipulation in the way, I’m going to side with their current road sweaters that have “DALLAS” emblazoned across the front with the number on the front of the sweater with it. This sweater in particular started as their alternate sweater, but the look was so good already on their home blacksweater, they had to double their pleasure by putting it on the white as well.

It’s a look that goes against the grain for most NHL sweaters and it often reminds fans a bit too much of the NFL. The crazy part here, it’s a good look. It’s clean, has the Stars logo on the shoulders, and looks seamless. Black, green, and gold are the main colors for the team, but the white sweaters pop with ferocity.

Worst: When you create an alternate sweater that instead of making fans and curious on-lookers think of constellations and the heavens the way it was supposed to, makes them think of cows and female reproductive organs, you’ve failed. The “mooterus” sweater is one that rather than being a hockey sweater is an awkward test of human psychology; like an ink blot test that everyone calls out for being “fallopian tubes” instead of “cattle constellation.” It’s awkward, it’s ugly, it makes everyone squirm in their seats because they’re thinking of seventh grade health class.

Old-timey favorite: All right, now it’s time to talk North Stars. Perhaps the saddest part about Norm Green screwing over the fans in Minnesota when he moved the team to Dallas is that we were forced to lose the Minnesota North Stars sweater. With the perfect logo, the fun color scheme, and a look that lives on to this day as a popular one for NHL fans, it’s one I’m still sad isn’t around on the ice night in and night out. It’s one of those perfect sweaters from the 70s and 80s that everyone can say that they love. Much like the Whalers and Nordiques, when the North Stars moved away part of hockey’s heart went with it.

Assessment: The Stars’ current sweaters are great. They’re boring, but they’re great. The home black sweater is just as good as the road white and while the logo isn’t the biggest part of either. While the logo lives on in their white alternate sweater (one that features their great secondary logo on the shoulders as well) the Stars just don’t have that sort of iconic look to them even in spite of winning the Stanley Cup in 1999. I’m sure fans in Dallas will disagree with me on this and hate that the North Stars are even mentioned here, but you’re going to have to deal with it.

  1. 182below0 - Aug 12, 2011 at 11:14 PM

    I think the best Stars sweaters in Dallas were the home whites from 2000 until the Reebok ones. But I’ll agree with you that the North Stars sweaters were the best. Hopefully they’ll do a third that look more like the North Stars.

    • kopy - Aug 15, 2011 at 1:27 PM

      No. The Dallas Stars can do what they want, but emulating a past that wants nothing to do with them is something that Minnesota wouldn’t appreciate and Dallas shouldn’t concern themselves with. The real tragedy is the North Stars were one of the last pro teams moved before the trend of keeping a teams history, logo, and colors in the original location, a la Cleveland Browns.

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