Skip to content

PHT makes the case for the Hart Trophy finallists

Jun 22, 2011, 4:00 PM EDT

perryhitsstlouis AP

Aside from perhaps the Conn Smythe Trophy and the Stanley Cup victory that usually goes with it, there aren’t many honors bigger than the Hart Trophy. Being named the most valuable player after an 82-game season is simply an outstanding feat. In fact, it’s impressive to even be nominated.

The PHT staff makes the case for three strong candidates.

James O’Brien’s case for Corey Perry:

Many people arguing for Perry will fixate on his notable achievement of being the only player to score 50 goals in the 2010-11 season. The other side will point out that both Daniel Sedin and Martin St. Louis scored more overall points. Some might even dock Perry a vote or two because he’s not exactly the most well-liked player in the league.

With the biggest numbers being so close, I think it’s best to break a virtual tie by looking at how often a player was called upon. Perry averaged 22:18 minutes per game, second only to Ilya Kovalchuk (St. Louis averaged 20:58 while Sedin averaged just 18:33). Most impressively, Perry averaged 1:38 of shorthanded time per game to 27 seconds for St. Louis and six seconds for Sedin.

In other words, Perry wasn’t just carrying the Ducks into the playoffs with his torrid second half scoring run. He was also called upon to kill penalties, agitate opponents and play a physical game. Perry might not be the most popular player in the NHL, but he was the most valuable player of the 2010-11 season.

Joe Yerdon’s case for Daniel Sedin:

I’m guessing that saying, “Well his brother won it last year,”  won’t fly as an excuse, right? All right then.

Daniel’s case for the Hart is pretty easy to make. He was the top point scorer in the league on the best team in the regular season. Sure, he had Henrik there side by side with him helping to set him up for his 41 goals this season, good for a fourth place tie with teammate Ryan Kesler in the NHL. Daniel did his fair share of dishing it out too with 63 assists, good for third in the league.

Daniel’s efforts through the regular season made it so that some wondered about how both he and his brother were finding ways to one-up the other when it comes to racking up the points. Considering the MVP season Henrik had last year, that’s as good of a compliment as you’ll find for how Daniel did this year.

Matt Reitz’s case for Martin St. Louis:

We hear all the time about players who make their teammates better—and no one displays that better than Martin St. Louis. Early in the year, it was St. Louis’ teammate Steven Stamkos who was getting most of the accolades; but as the season went on, it was clear that St. Louis is the man that made Tampa Bay’s potent offense go. By the time the season ended, he was second in the league with 68 assists and 99 points. The 31 goals weren’t too shabby either.

The Hart is supposed to be the player who is most important to his team. From that perspective, it’s difficult to find another player around the league who matches up with St. Louis. He has proven that he can produce with any number of linemmates on the ice—yet when he’s put another high skilled player, he has the ability to catapult his teammate to stardom. While Stamkos got off to a great start, one of the reasons he was so productive was because St. Louis was setting him up every game. But when Stamkos stopped scoring, it was St. Louis who helped lead the Lightning to the 5th seed in the East.

No player is more important to his team, because no player in the league has the ability to make his teammates better like St. Louis.


  1. yuckygeo - Jun 22, 2011 at 4:22 PM

    Why is being the league’s top scorer on the league’s best team part of why D. Sedin should be MVP? Isn’t it easier to score when you’re on the best team?

    Not to say he doesn’t deserve consideration, but it isn’t like he was laboring in Columbus or Long Island.

    • warpstonebc - Jun 22, 2011 at 4:39 PM

      You could also flip that around: the team is one of the best in the league because he scores.

      Still, Perry carried his team on his back. The Canucks had several players step up throughout the season. Daniel is a very valuable player, but clearly Perry is most important to his team.

      • yuckygeo - Jun 22, 2011 at 10:26 PM

        There’s no doubt that D. Sedin played a big role in the Canucks success. It’s more that Vancouver had players other than Daniel have good seasons.

Sign up for Fantasy hockey

Top 10 NHL Player Searches
  1. J. Quick (1431)
  2. B. Schenn (1147)
  3. N. Horton (1077)
  4. A. Ovechkin (1056)
  5. B. Bishop (1055)