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Canucks need more from the Sedin twins in tight playoff games

May 3, 2011, 8:36 PM EDT

Henrik Sedin, Daniel Sedin AP

There was an interesting moment in the Vancouver Canucks’ Game 7 match against the Chicago Blackhawks. Henrik Sedin had a ridiculous amount of open space late in that contest, but he elected to make a nice pass instead. Many people critiqued the decision on Twitter, but people ignored one basic fact: that’s just the kind of the player that Henrik Sedin is.

For mostly better but occasionally worse, the Sedin twins are who they are. A lot of sportswriters want to question their “heart” or toughness during their recent struggles, but the twins are dominant because of their synchronicity and intellect, so blaming a lack of brawn seems to miss the point. It’s also important to note that they haven’t been totally useless in the playoffs; Daniel has five goals and two assists for seven points while Henrik has five assists in Vancouver’s nine postseason games.

That being said, the team needs more from Daniel Sedin and his doppelganger than what they’ve been getting lately.

Dave Bolland began their slump

It all seemed to fall apart once Dave Bolland returned for the Blackhawks in Game 4. Since then, Henrik only has one point* and a -7 rating while Daniel has two goals and a -6 rating in their last six games. The smothering defense of the Canucks’ last three games have resulted in goose eggs for those transfixing, robotic ginger twins (neither player managed to score a single point in the last three games).

On one hand, it’s fair to blame tough matchups for their struggles. It’s not crazy to follow the pattern of more Bolland = more frustration for the Sedin twins. The Nashville Predators provide an even tougher collective task for the Sedin twins considering their elite defensive duo of Shea Weber and Ryan Suter, Vezina Trophy nominee Pekka Rinne and fleet of checking forwards.

Still, it’s not a great sign when an opposing coach moves his top guns to another line.

In Saturday night’s game, the twins received the ultimate diss when Predators coach Barry Trotz moved his shut-down tandem of Shea Weber and Ryan Suter off them and on to Ryan Kesler’s line.

If you’re expecting the Sedins to panic, then you haven’t been following these even-keeled Swedes for very long.

Ultimately, the Sedin twins must overcome challenges

While the buck stops at them, the other thing that is plaguing those cycling clones might be a lack of a great complimentary linemate.

Alex Burrows‘ mixture of goal scoring ability and space-opening grit was a great match for the Sedin twins during much of the 2010-11 season, but he has been playing on Ryan Kesler’s line for much of the playoffs. As a result, the Sedins have skated with Mikael Samuelsson and other wingers without finding an ideal fit.

It won’t be easy – and it might be a bit much to expect an explosion of points, even if they do break through – but if the Sedins want to truly be considered elite, they need to perform in the playoffs. Tonight’s Game 3 match will be another great test, especially since Predators coach Barry Trotz will decide how which players will attempt to limit the cerebral siblings.

* It’s silly to linger on the fact that Henrik doesn’t have a goal, though. He’s always been the “Passing Sedin.” In his Hart Trophy 2009-10 season, 83 of his 112 points came from assists. That trend continued this season, as 75 of his 94 points were helpers

  1. tommytd - May 3, 2011 at 8:41 PM

    I’M SICK OF HEARING ABOUT THE TWINS…ENOUGH ALREADY!

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