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Steve Moore still feels effects of notorious Todd Bertuzzi incident seven years later

Mar 8, 2011, 11:29 PM EST

Roberto Luongo, Todd Bertuzzi AP

As the hockey world debates the suspension-worthiness of Zdeno Chara’s hit on Max Pacioretty and hopes the best for the forward’s health, March 8th also marks the seventh anniversary of one of the worst incidents in the history of the sport.

In an attempt to gain revenge for Steve Moore’s concussion-inducing (but legal) hit on Markus Naslund, Todd Bertuzzi attacked Moore from behind during a Vancouver Canucks-Colorado Avalanche game. It was probably not Bertuzzi’s intention to drive Moore’s head to the ice during that exchange, but that’s what happened in a horrible moment that was replayed over and over again on 24-hour news networks.

Over the last seven years, the incident has gone from the front of the sports page to an ugly moment many have forgotten.

Bertuzzi is currently playing fairly well (although he lacks the edge that made him a star power forward) while coach Marc Crawford is now behind the Dallas Stars’ bench, yet Moore still feels the effects of that hit.

Not only will he never play in the NHL again, but Dominic Moore‘s brother remains hindered thanks to the concussion he suffered as a result from the impact. Here’s more information via Moore’s lawyer, from the Globe & Mail.

“We have the top neurosurgeons in the world on this case and we have reached the point where we can say Steve’s brain injury is permanent,” Timothy Danson said Monday. “Unfortunately for Steve Moore, he’s not only dealing with the loss of his NHL career, he has to deal with the serious damage to his post-NHL career as a result of the brain injury.”

(snip)

In the seven years since the Bertuzzi-Moore incident: Bertuzzi was criminally charged, pled guilty to assault and received a conditional discharge; Moore and his parents filed a multi-million-dollar suit; Bertuzzi and the Canucks have filed counter-claims as have Bertuzzi and Crawford, the Canucks’ former coach. Bertuzzi is claiming he was following Crawford’s orders to make Moore “pay the price” for the hit on Naslund while Crawford has said Bertuzzi acted in “direct disobedience” for not coming off the ice before the attack occurred.

Danson said the legal entanglement has been a double-edged sword.

“While the delay has been very frustrating, it has also been helpful in this sense: you need the passage of time to fully understand the complete implications of the brain injury,” he said of Moore’s situation. “If you go to court a couple of years post-injury, it could be argued that it’s premature and that we need more time to have the rehabilitation process run its course.”

Hearing that Moore’s career is over is tough, but the fact that his day-to-day life is still impacted by the concussion really makes it that much more difficult to stomach. We’ll let you know if details regarding the civil suit surface.

  1. jpelle82 - Mar 9, 2011 at 11:16 AM

    bertuzzi should have been banned for life…moore can never play again so bertuzzi shouldnt either

    • derpdederpdederp - Mar 10, 2011 at 12:16 PM

      exactly. suspensions for malicious hits should be along the lines of “you dont play again until the guy you injured does”. for scum like matt cooke and todd bertuzzi that means you dont play again. ever. you ruin another players career, what right do you have to keep playing?

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