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Could four extra inches behind the net open up 'Gretzky's office' again?

Sep 12, 2010, 6:00 PM EDT

ingretzkysoffice.jpgIn Oliver Stone’s otherwise middling football move “Any Give Sunday,” Al Pacino gives a great and typically over-the-top speech about the sport (and life) being a “game of inches.” If hockey is the same way, a small change could pay dividends for the NHL’s most clever players.

The Boston Globe’s Fluto Shinzawa discussed the NHL’s subtle decision to decrease the depth of its nets by four inches, a small-and-barely-noticeable change that could be a boon to the best finesse players and defensemen. Even if it’s a tiny difference.

One of the minor tweaks made during last month’s research and development camp in Toronto was to reduce the depth of the net by 4 inches. By creating just that much more space behind the net, NHL thinkers believe it could free up room for offensive chances at one end and breakouts at the other.

There used to be a time when Wayne Gretzky made his living behind the net, holding onto the puck and looking to set up teammates for in-front chances. But one of the most significant shifts across the league has been the embrace of collapsing zone defenses.

In Gretzky’s prime, coaches were still instructing their forwards to stretch out and take away the points. Now, the emphasis is on eliminating the slot as a danger area.

Defensemen are stationed in front of the net. Forwards are scurrying away from the points and collapsing. As a result, there is less breathing room in front, and playmakers haven’t been as free to create from behind the net.

Perhaps with a few more inches of open ice, a playmaker like Nicklas Backstrom could dangle around defensemen, force others to commit one way, then look for Alex Ovechkin the other way.

As superhuman as Wayne Gretzky and other prolific scorers look in those hazy replays from the 1980s, one thing that also stands out is the absurd amount of space defenders used to give up. To say that coaches have caught up to many of the best offensive tricks is an understatement. There’s a reason why the league keeps searching for little ways to open up the game, even if it’s come a long way since the putrid Dead Puck Era of the mid-to-late 90s.

It won’t make the passing lanes any bigger, but I’d love to get the chance to watch Marc Savard, Sidney Crosby, Joe Thornton and Backstrom show up to work in “Gretzky’s Office” more often. Perhaps this tweak will make that entertaining option more viable for NHL teams.

(H/T to Kukla’s Korner.)

  1. NYRFTW - Sep 12, 2010 at 9:04 PM

    A standard NHL rink is 200 feet long and 85 feet wide, with goal lines 11 feet from the end boards. This ice size eliminates time and space, which eliminates most scoring chances. Players now are way to big and fast for this ice surface. They train al year and there is really no off season. Scoring mostly revolves around the PP, which is a cheap way to win games in my opinion. Hockey is designed to be 5-5, not 5-4, 5-3. The better team should be able to win playing 5-5. A smaller ice surface promotes more opportunity to take penalties since time and space is basically eliminated.
    International ice is 210 feet long and 98 feet wide. Goal lines are 13 feet from the end boards. The extra room allows more time and space, which leads to more scoring chances. This size is more practical to the current NHL player and would give a throwback look to what the NHL looked like in the 80′s and early 90′s when players were scoring way more goals, or at least having a lot more opportunities to score.
    The NHL doesn’t need to make goals bigger, goalie pads smaller, create horrible rules that turn fans off. Just increase the size of the ice to international and the game will be great again!

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