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Why Nathan Horton might (or might not) make a big impact as a Boston Bruin

Sep 11, 2010, 7:00 PM EDT

nathanhortonboston.jpgWhen you ask many Boston Bruins fans (and hockey fans in general) about the team’s biggest transactions – or lack thereof – this off-season, they’d probably mention drafting Tyler Seguin or not trading Marc Savard or Tim Thomas. Yet when it all comes down to it, the biggest impact move might be landing talented-but-often-injured forward Nathan Horton in a trade with the Florida Panthers.

Bruins blog Stanley Cup of Chowder discusses the possible production of Horton in Boston, but I think Phunwin’s original introduction of the trade explains the situation (both the pros and the cons) most succinctly.

Suppose I told you that Boston’s major offseason trade involved the Bruins picking up a guy whose goal scoring totals have declined three straight years, who has missed 32 games in the last two seasons, was a minus player the last two years, and to get him, they traded a defenseman who led the team in points during the playoffs, had a higher GVT than Zdeno Chara in 2008-9 and they threw in the 15th overall draft pick to boot.

Now, suppose I told you that Boston’s major offseason trade involved the Bruins picking up a guy who has scored 20 goals for five straight years, just turned 25 years old, was the 3rd overall pick in the 2003 draft, was the plus-minus leader for the Panthers last year, among players who played at least 40 games, and to get him, they gave away a defenseman who was a -14 player last year, was booed at home on several occasions, and threw in a mid-first round pick to get the deal done.

Let’s discuss some of the most tantalizing aspects of the addition first. Horton’s best center over most of his years with the Florida Panthers has been Stephen Weiss, who is actually quite a bit better than people realize but isn’t exactly an explosive player. Despite that fact, Horton tallied at least 20 goals in the last five seasons, even when hampered with injuries the last two campaigns (he totaled 20 in 65 games last season and 22 in 67 during 08-09). Imagine what the big, young (he’s only 25 years old) and skilled forward could accomplish if he skates shotgun with Marc Savard? Even if he doesn’t get first line billing, Patrice Bergeron and David Krejci are capable pivots too.

Of course, then we get to the Ifs. Horton missed 32 games over the last two seasons, with an injury as serious as a fractured leg in 09-10. Let’s not also forget the fact that two of the Bruins’ best centers (Savard and Bergeron) faced some serious concussion issues themselves, either.

This might seem like an asinine point, but I’ve also noticed that the best players on bad teams often flop in new atmospheres – just like at other supposed diamonds in the Florida rough, Olli Jokinen and Jay Bouwmeester. (Remember when Jokinen was just a fabulous goal scorer stuck with the crummy Panthers? Yeah, so much for that.)

Those minuses aside, Horton isn’t expected to be the best player on the ice in Florida. If he can be a good compliment to Savard – and another tough to move body alongside Milan Lucic – he’ll be worth the cost of the trade. Of course, he’s going to have to stay healthy enough to prove himself, too.

  1. Joshua Guzzetti - Sep 12, 2010 at 5:13 PM

    In the last paragraph do you mean to say that Horton isn’t expected to be the best player on the ice in Boston? Just sayin’….

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