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In four games, Chicago fans clearly louder than Philly fans

Jun 5, 2010, 3:45 PM EDT

Fans of the Philadelphia Flyers developed quite a reputation as some of the most brutal in all of American sports. (I make sure to mention “American,” since soccer hooligans will sometimes … you know, kill people and stuff.)

But there’s one area where – at least compared to Chicago Blackhawks fans – they fall short: noise. After two games in Chicago and two games in Philadelphia, NHL.com’s studies show that the deep dish crowd beat the cheesesteak crew.

While Chicago’s highest levels were 121 dB and 122 dB, Philadelphia’s peaks were 114 dB in Game 3 and 118 dB in Game 4. The loudest moment of Game 4 came when Jeff Carter scored the game-sealing empty net goal, driving fans into a frenzy that sounded like a shotgun.

Now, there is one big factor to remember: Chicago’s United Center is even bigger than Philadelphia’s Wachovia Center. While you can make “quality over quantity” arguments day and night, the more screaming fans you have the higher decibel rates you’re likely to achieve. And, as I pointed out in the last look at the competing noise-makers, both fan bases create noise that can cause some genuine damage (or at least discomfort) to your ears. So there’s no shame in “losing” this contest.

Either way, this is a clash of two passionate groups in some of hockey’s best American markets. The series might be tied 2-2, but so far, Blackhawks fans won at least one “battle.”

  1. alex - Jun 5, 2010 at 4:58 PM

    THIS GOES W/O SAYING. I only hope and pray that the blackhawks aren’t going the way of the cubbies….choke, choke, choke…….wait ’til next year, blah, blah, blah.

  2. clight - Jun 5, 2010 at 11:06 PM

    .0058 dB per Philly fan in game 4 (118 db / 20,304 fans) vs. .0055 dB per Chicago fan in game 2 (122 dB / 22,275).
    hey chicago…shhhhh

  3. Alyssa Hickman - Jun 11, 2010 at 10:49 PM

    Decibels don’t quite work like that, more like a logarithmic scale. Let’s say that a “sone” (an unit I just made up) actually is how much sound there is in 0 dB. 10 dB has 10 sones, 20 dB has 100 sones, and so on, so forth. Basically, you put a place between the tens and the units in the decibel ratings.
    Using that logic, Philadelphia fans put out 6.37 x 10^11 sones for all 20,304 fans (because of the 10^11.8 sones) and each fan makes 3.11 x 10^7 sones in average, so the real decibels made by each and every Flyers fan is more like 74.9 dB.
    In this case, Chicago fans put out 1.58 x 10^12 sones for all 22,275 fans and each fan makes 7.11 x 10^7 sones in average. End result, the dB made by Chicago fans are 78.5 dB. (The Chicago fans are thus twice as loud as the Piladelphia fans)
    One last thing: I heard reports that the Flyers’ game 3 in the Bell Center vs. the Montreal Canadiens (Eastern Conference Final) even went up to 133 dB, which is more than 10 times as loud as United Center during game 2 in the Stanley Cup Final even though they were “only” 21,273 to scream like that. Unless that’s another of the Habs’ games but it would still have to be a Habs home game. If the 133 dB reading was indeed confirmed, then the average noise made by a Habs fan during game 3 of the ECF (when Cammalleri scored the first goal of the game) would be 89.7 dB, good for 9.37 x 10^8 sones each. Conclusion: Habs fan can be as many as 13 times as loud as Hawks fans.

  4. Alyssa Hickman - Jun 11, 2010 at 10:50 PM

    Decibels don’t quite work like that, more like a logarithmic scale. Let’s say that a “sone” (an unit I just made up) actually is how much sound there is in 0 dB. 10 dB has 10 sones, 20 dB has 100 sones, and so on, so forth. Basically, you put a place between the tens and the units in the decibel ratings.
    Using that logic, Philadelphia fans put out 6.37 x 10^11 sones for all 20,304 fans (because of the 10^11.8 sones) and each fan makes 3.11 x 10^7 sones in average, so the real decibels made by each and every Flyers fan is more like 74.9 dB.
    In this case, Chicago fans put out 1.58 x 10^12 sones for all 22,275 fans and each fan makes 7.11 x 10^7 sones in average. End result, the dB made by Chicago fans are 78.5 dB. (The Chicago fans are thus twice as loud as the Piladelphia fans)
    One last thing: I heard reports that the Flyers’ game 3 in the Bell Center vs. the Montreal Canadiens (Eastern Conference Final) even went up to 133 dB, which is more than 10 times as loud as United Center during game 2 in the Stanley Cup Final even though they were “only” 21,273 to scream like that. Unless that’s another of the Habs’ games but it would still have to be a Habs home game. If the 133 dB reading was indeed confirmed, then the average noise made by a Habs fan during game 3 of the ECF (when Cammalleri scored the first goal of the game) would be 89.7 dB, good for 9.37 x 10^8 sones each. Conclusion: Habs fan can be as many as 13 times as loud as Hawks fans.

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