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Explaining the "too many men" penalty

May 15, 2010, 11:15 AM EDT

Bruins4.jpgAfter all of the “too many men” penalties we’ve seen in the playoffs,
it was inevitable that one would occur in historic fashion. The Boston
Bruins were trying their best to fight off the Flyers in the third
period of Game 7, having already given up a 3-0 lead and were close to
finishing off a monumental collapse.

Then, the team was caught
with too many men on the ice and the Flyers scored to go-ahead goal on
the ensuing power play. The first thing I thought of was the too many
men the San Jose Sharks weren’t caught with against the Red Wings
(although that was far from a deciding factor), then my next thought was
this had better not be a ticky tack call.

Was it legitimate? A
mix up involving Marc Savard and the bench led to too many men involved
in the play. There were two centers out on the ice, something a number
of the Bruins players noticed immediately.
Chad Finn of the Bruins Blog
passes along these explanations from
the Bruins:

“We had a player [Savard] with his stick
up like he wanted to make a
change, then he changed his mind,” coach Claude Julien explained. “So we
had the next center [Sobotka] jumping on”

“I saw two centermen out there, and I was like, ‘What’s going on?’ “”
Lucic said of the penalty, which happened at the 8:50 mark of the final
period. “Obviously something happened, there was a miscommunication and
we had to get off before we got caught. We got caught.”

According to the Bruins, Savard skated over for a change but didn’t
see anyone coming on so he stayed on the ice. The Bruins weren’t able to
cover up the gaffe quick enough and were caught. It certainly seems as
though a legitimate call was made, especially when this wasn’t just an
instance of a lazy change resulting in too many men actually out on the
ice. This was a mistake by the bench.

Apparently, Mark Recchi and Shawn Thornton didn’t agree with the
call, but when the coach isn’t making a stink about it generally that
means a good call was made.

“Well, I want to play a couple more years in this league so I don’t
want to bad mouth [the officials] too much,” Thornton said. “I do think
. . . I had a pretty good seat for the third period, and I was close to
where the guy was changing and I think it was very, very, very gutsy
call with seven minutes left with all of the other [expletive] that’s
going on out there.”

Of course, this loss can hardly be pinned on the penalty or the
ensuing goal. This loss was about the Bruins failing to keep the
pressure on after grabbing a big, this was about the Bruins once again
lacking the killer instinct needed to win four straight elimination
games.

  1. Habs fan - May 15, 2010 at 12:06 PM

    Deja vu all over again for Don Cherry’s Bruins in 1979
    Guy Lafleur goal on Boston – Game 7, Semi Final (1979)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=12-x70nq0vI

  2. ken - May 15, 2010 at 12:32 PM

    are you kidding me thornton? not only were there 6 players out there (not including the goalie), but they were all in motion during the play. not anywhere near coming off for a an early change which is what you are trying to say. how about showing up and actually playing instead of complaining. that way you take the calls completely out of the situation.

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