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Don't forget about the Philadelphia Flyers

May 13, 2010, 2:00 PM EDT

Briere.jpgWhat the Montreal Canadiens have been able to do so far in the
playoffs is certainly tremendous. They’re the eighth seed in the East
and have taken out the two darlings of the NHL, the Pittsburgh Penguins
and the Washington Capitals.

No more Sid. No more Ovi. All thanks
to the Canadiens.

But we can’t forget about the Philadelphia
Flyers have the chance to accomplish.

The Flyers were a team
that everyone wrote off at the end of the season, as they needed a
shootout win just to make the playoffs and were playing with an injury
depleted team with Brian Boucher in net. While they’d never admit it,
I’m sure there was even a number of Flyers fans certain that their team
didn’t have much hope in the postseason.

Now, after a relatively
easy win against the New Jersey Devils in round one, the Flyers are on
the doorstep of making history. It’s an improbable scenario that no one
could have seen coming, especially with how the Boston Bruins played in
the first three games. Only two teams in the history of the NHL have
come back from being down 3-0 in a series to win, and the Flyers have
all the momentum heading into tomorrow night’s Game 7 showdown.

They’re
receiving big play from the players they need it most from, no more so
than what’s happened with Daniel Briere in the second round. He’s done
nothing but play better and more dominant as the series has progressed
and last night was a difference maker for his team in a game that was
likely much closer than expected.

The Flyers have been able to
find success with an incredible amount of injuries to key players, with
Jeff Carter, Simon Gagne and Dan Carcillo all being affected by
injuries. Gagne’s early return with a broken toe helped to spark the
Flyers in Game 4 and now the team has Michael Leighton in net after
Brian Boucher was likely lost for the playoffs.

Successful teams
in the playoffs are able to overcome injuries and whatever adversity
comes their way, rarely able to just roll over the competition on their
way to the Stanley Cup. No one expected the Flyers to get this far and
yet here we are, on the eve of a historic Game 7 that could propel the
team into perhaps the most unexpected Conference finals matchup we’ve
ever seen in the NHL.

The Flyers are a hungry team now, feeling
the momentum build as they collected three wins in a row. They know that
Game 6 is just another win and all that matters is what happens on
Friday night. From
CSN Philly:

The real test for Briere and his
teammates will come Friday in
Boston, when the Flyers’ playoff fate will be decided. They are the
first team since the 1975 New York Islanders to force a Game 7 after
being down 3-0 in a series.

But, Briere said, that isn’t what
he’s after.

“That’s not good enough,” Briere said. “I want to be
part of that three teams that came all the way back and clinched. We
know what’s at stake, and it’s very special.”

  1. Sue - May 14, 2010 at 12:50 PM

    You wrote, “While they’d never admit it, I’m sure there was even a number of Flyers fans certain that their team didn’t have much hope in the postseason.”
    I’ll be the first Flyers fan to stand up and say that it is a complete SHOCK they are as far as they are. But it is also a testament to their resolve, and their ability to overcome that adversity everyone talks about.
    Brandon, this is a great piece. Even if the Flyers don’t pass Boston tonight, they have proven beyond a reasonable doubt that they are capable. They can only look up from here.
    This is the 35th year out of 43 seasons that this team has enjoyed a playoff run. A Conference Championship win will give them their 9th. Not bad for a team who needed overtime to even make the playoffs.

  2. deadmic - May 14, 2010 at 2:55 PM

    am i too lazy to read? wheres game 7? im still sleepy sike! hype n sparculated ’bout the flyers! this is a good reason for cheer! deadmic.com

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