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2010 NHL playoffs: We have a snake on the ice

Apr 14, 2010, 10:54 PM EDT

Well, it certainly wasn’t the barrage of snakes everyone was hoping for.

Nevertheless, the Throw The Snake movement was at least somewhat successful, when after the Coyotes tied the game 1-1 on Keith Yandle’s goal…..

….a lone snake was hurled onto the ice.

Snake.jpgAs far as the actual game goes, the Coyotes are doing exactly what will lead a team to an early exit in the playoffs: stop playing the game that got them to the playoffs in the first place. Phoenix allowed the Red Wings to rattle of 18 shots in the first period, playing like a nervous team that was in the playoffs for the first time in eight years.

Ilya Bryzgalov was solid, but allowed a soft goal to Tomas Holmstrom and then never saw Lidstrom’s shot from the point. The Wings have controlled the area in front of the crease all game long.

This is what has happened with Tippett’s teams before in the playoffs. Can he get them back on track?

Screen grab courtesy of Greg Wyshynski.

  1. Bob S. - Apr 15, 2010 at 7:50 AM

    On April 15, 1952, the Montreal Canadiens met the Detroit Red Wings in Game 4 of the Stanley Cup finals at the Olympia in Detroit. Detriot led the series 3 games to 0 and had won 7 playoff games in a row. A pair of fans, Pete and Jerry Cusimano, threw an octopus on the ice, their father was working in the fish business. The 8 tentacles of the octopus symbolized the 8 games the Red Wings needed to win to be Stanley Cup champions. Detroit won the game 3-0 to sweep the series and a new tradition was born. Fans continue to throw octopuses on the ice at Red Wings games for good luck. At Detroit’s Joe Louis Arena, a huge mechanical octopus was suspended from the rafters.

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